dolorosa_12: (sokka)
Today is a public holiday in my part of the world, and I'm absolutely astonished at how productive I've been able to be when I have three days off work instead of two. So far this weekend I have:

  • Cleaned the bathroom

  • Planted lavender, thyme, mint, and rosemary in our garden

  • Gone through all my clothes and thrown out anything that's worn out, filled with holes or otherwise unwearable (I wear my clothes to death - there were some items that were fifteen years old in the latest clear-out, so nothing is ever in a state to donate to charity)

  • Gone through the massive stack of paperwork on my desk in our study, and sorted it all into folders, tidied it away, and thus cleared a working space in an area that has been covered with piles of paper for months on end

  • Cooked an extremely elaborate roast chicken dinner, and made a soup using the chicken bones and leftovers

  • Cleaned the kitchen, including wiping out the inside of drawers and the fridge

  • Done two loads of laundry

  • Written and queued up a book review for a new project one of my friends has started (the review isn't scheduled to post for a few weeks, but I'll link it when it's live)

  • Made plum-infused vodka


  • In other words, why can't all weekends be three days long?

    Last week, Matthias and I went to the Norfolk coast with four friends. The place we were staying was in between Cromer and Sheringham, and although we were expecting pretty miserable weather, it was super warm and we were even able to hang out on the beach for a morning.

    Photos behind the cut )

    All in all, the last week has been pretty great.
    dolorosa_12: (epic internet)
    So. Lots of stuff to get through this week, as my corner of the internet has been particularly full of people doing wonderful, clever and awesome things.

    Rochita Loenen-Ruiz had a busy week. Here's Rochita on the uses of anger, her new short story, and being interviewed for Lightspeed magazine's author spotlight.

    Catherine Lundoff has had so many submissions to her 'Older Women in SFF' recommendations post that she's had to split it into two. Part one, part two.

    I really liked this review of Zen Cho's writing by Naomi Novik.

    This review by Sarah Mesle of the most recent episode of Game of Thrones made a lot of points I've been struggling to articulate. Content note for discussion of violence, abuse and rape.

    I really appreciated this thoughtful post by Tade Thompson on safety, community and dissent.

    Natalie Luhrs makes some really important points here:

    This is part of the ongoing conversation about the importance of different voices in our community. About making space for people who have been told–explicitly and implicitly–that what they have to say isn’t worthwhile and that they need to sit down and listen and that someday, maybe, they’ll be allowed to speak.

    This list of Best Young Australian novelists looks great, and reflects the Australia that I grew up in. Congratulations to all the winners!

    I have to admit that the #hometovote hashtag has been making me cry.

    I wrote two longish posts this week. One is over at Wordpress: a review of Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel. The other is here at Dreamwidth/LJ, and is a primer to Sophia McDougall's Romanitas trilogy.

    My mother is a radio journalist. Her programme this week is on Eurovision, and you can listen to it here (not geoblocked). There are additional features . I am an unashamed Eurovision fan, and as you can see, it runs in the family.

    Texts from Hieronymous Bosch made me laugh and laugh.

    Happy Friday, everyone.
    dolorosa_12: (ship)
    My partner's parents visited us in Cambridge over the Easter long weekend (and will be here for the next week or so). We mostly stayed close to home, although we ventured out to the Scott Polar Research Museum on Saturday. On Sunday I cooked a rather over the top lunch, and yesterday we went on a bit of a seaside adventure to Hunstanton.

    Photos behind the cut )

    I love the sea, and I really miss it. In Sydney I was a five-minute walk from water, and had a clear view of Sydney Harbour from the roof of my apartment building. I grew up swimming in the ocean. I miss having it as part of my regular landscape.
    dolorosa_12: (teen wolf)
    This week's linkpost is all Terry Pratchett. I came to his writing later than most, as I was in my early twenties before I read a single word of his. A good friend of mine and I had made a deal: he would watch Buffy the Vampire Slayer, and I would read Pratchett. I think it was a good deal for both of us. I started with Guards! Guards!, and never looked back. My favourite Pratchett book is Small Gods, for all the qualities that made Pratchett such a powerful writer: warm humour, a perceptive understanding of human nature, an intelligent way with words that included rather than excluded, and a patience with human frailty.

    This is a Storify of Pratchett's last tweets. (Warning: bring tissues.)

    Here Nymeth provides her reminiscences at Things Mean A Lot.

    Jo Walton recalls her first meeting with Pratchett over at Tor.com.

    I also liked this piece by Julie Beck at the Atlantic.

    The obituary at the BBC is here.

    As usual, xkcd says in a few words what would take me several thousand.

    I think, however, that Abi Sutherland says it best:

    He saw the monstrosities of our world: economic inequality, racism, sexism, religious bigotry, the abuses of narrative and myth. And he made them irresistibly ludicrous, laying them relentlessly out until their inner absurdity smothered them, until the least bizzare and most reasonable thing in the story was that it took place on a disc resting on the backs of four elephants standing on the shell of a giant space turtle.

    He was both wise and kind.


    The world could do with a bit more wisdom accompanied by kindness.
    dolorosa_12: (emily hanna)
    I have so many links for you this week! My Twitter feed has been very generous in sharing its fabulous internet finds, and I've gathered the best of them to post here.

    First up, have a couple of short stories. 'Translatio Corporis' by Kat Howard and 'The Monkey House' by Tade Thompson absolutely rocked my world. They're published in Uncanny Magazine and Omenana respectively.

    I went on a massive Twitter rant about failures of imagination in historical fantasy novels set in medieval Britain and Ireland, so I found this post on 'Celtic fantasy' by Liz Bourke to be very welcome and timely.

    Likewise this post by Kate Elliott on writing women characters touched on a lot of things that matter to me in storytelling.

    Joanne Harris makes some good points about the economics of literary festivals.

    This post by Renay is very perceptive on self-rejection, anthology-curation and the difficulties in amplifying the voices of others.

    I found the conversation taking place at the #WritingNewZA hashtag on South African literature really interesting.

    Tricia Sullivan writes about the pitfalls of being a mother who writes. (I would say that this potentially applies to primary caregivers of any gender, but there are particularly gendered elements of the problems she's outlining that lead me to think her emphasis on mothers specifically is correct in this instance.)

    Here is a Storify of tweets by Aliette de Bodard about the fallacy of devoting your entire life to writing.

    I grew up on Sara Douglass's books, and while they're far from perfect, she herself was a really important figure in the history of fantasy literature in Australia. Here, Australian fantasy author Fiona McIntosh remembers her.

    I've found Abigail Nussbaum's recent Hugo recommendation posts useful. Here's the short fiction one, and here's the one on publishing and fan categories.

    I want to see this film!

    I'm thoroughly enjoying watching Ana discover the Dark Is Rising sequence over at The Book Smugglers.

    This is a good summation of what made Parks and Recreation so great, over The Mary Sue.

    Finally, have an Old English text about the wonders of books.

    The sun is shining and the sky is clear here in Cambridge. It looks like this weekend is going to be excellent for me, and I hope it is the same for you.
    dolorosa_12: (Default)
    This week's linkpost is up a bit early, and contains many fabulous things.

    I'm a huge fan of Sophia McDougall's review of Birdman: over at Strange Horizons. In it, she compares the film to Boris Johnson. It's an apt comparison.

    Here's a great interview with Samantha Shannon. 'Cities are made of narrative' indeed.

    Aliette de Bodard's description of her subconscious as a library is a fabulous metaphor, and one that I might steal myself!

    There's a great set of guest posts over at Ladybusiness on 'What books are on your auto-recommend list?' (For the record, mine are the His Dark Materials trilogy by Philip Pullman, the Pagan Chronicles series by Catherine Jinks, Space Demons, Skymaze, Shinkei and Galax Arena by Gillian Rubinstein, Parkland, Earthsong, Fire Dancer and The Beast of Heaven by Victor Kelleher, the Romanitas trilogy by Sophia McDougall and the Crossroads trilogy by Kate Elliott.)

    Episode 4 of Fangirl Happy Hour is up. This week Ana and Renay are talking Karen Memory by Elizabeth Bear, Jupiter Ascending and Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.. I'm not quite as critical of S.H.I.E.L.D. as they are, while I think there's room for difference of opinion about the feminism of Jupiter Ascending, but as always, I appreciate their thoughts.

    The first few guest posts about representation and diversity are up on Jim C. Hines' blog.

    Shannon Hale talks about gender segregation at readings she's done at schools. It's heartbreaking.

    I thoroughly enjoyed this article by Robert Macfarlane about language and landscape. Beautiful stuff.

    I really liked the recent BBC adaptation of Hilary Mantel's Wolf Hall. This interview by Julia Raeside of Claire Foy, who played Anne Boleyn, goes a long way towards explaining why.

    For reasons that will soon become apparent, although I can't provide a link to it, the #readingAuthorName hashtag on Twitter has been a powerful and positive movement. It works like this: think of an author whose works moved you and shaped you into the person you are. Tweet about it. Add the hashtag #readingAuthorName (obviously replacing AuthorName for the author's actual name). Feel happy.
    dolorosa_12: (pagan kidrouk)
    This week's linkpost is up a bit early, and contains many fabulous things.

    I'm a huge fan of Sophia McDougall's review of Birdman: over at Strange Horizons. In it, she compares the film to Boris Johnson. It's an apt comparison.

    Here's a great interview with Samantha Shannon. 'Cities are made of narrative' indeed.

    Aliette de Bodard's description of her subconscious as a library is a fabulous metaphor, and one that I might steal myself!

    There's a great set of guest posts over at Ladybusiness on 'What books are on your auto-recommend list?' (For the record, mine are the His Dark Materials trilogy by Philip Pullman, the Pagan Chronicles series by Catherine Jinks, Space Demons, Skymaze, Shinkei and Galax Arena by Gillian Rubinstein, Parkland, Earthsong, Fire Dancer and The Beast of Heaven by Victor Kelleher, the Romanitas trilogy by Sophia McDougall and the Crossroads trilogy by Kate Elliott.)

    Episode 4 of Fangirl Happy Hour is up. This week Ana and Renay are talking Karen Memory by Elizabeth Bear, Jupiter Ascending and Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.. I'm not quite as critical of S.H.I.E.L.D. as they are, while I think there's room for difference of opinion about the feminism of Jupiter Ascending, but as always, I appreciate their thoughts.

    The first few guest posts about representation and diversity are up on Jim C. Hines' blog.

    Shannon Hale talks about gender segregation at readings she's done at schools. It's heartbreaking.

    I thoroughly enjoyed this article by Robert Macfarlane about language and landscape. Beautiful stuff.

    I really liked the recent BBC adaptation of Hilary Mantel's Wolf Hall. This interview by Julia Raeside of Claire Foy, who played Anne Boleyn, goes a long way towards explaining why.

    For reasons that will soon become apparent, although I can't provide a link to it, the #readingAuthorName hashtag on Twitter has been a powerful and positive movement. It works like this: think of an author whose works moved you and shaped you into the person you are. Tweet about it. Add the hashtag #readingAuthorName (obviously replacing AuthorName for the author's actual name). Feel happy.
    dolorosa_12: (Default)
    To say that all RH did was to utter words is a complete denial of what we are as writers. Words have power, and words wielded in hatred and violence are just as harmful as violence dealt out with fists.

    —Rochita Loenen-Ruiz, 'Standing Up and Speaking Truth'

    Yes, this is a post on Winterfox/Requires Hate/Benjanun Sriduangkaew. Consider that a content warning for references to abusive behaviour of many kinds. I've put the post behind a cut for that reason.

    Cut for discussion of harassment, abuse and bullying )

    Comments are screened in order to make this a safe space. I am intending to unscreen non-abusive comments, but will not publish any comments that people want to make privately. Please indicate in your comments if you would prefer them to be kept private.
    dolorosa_12: (teen wolf)
    It's Friday afternoon Saturday morning (and I'm mirroring this from my Wordpress blog), and that means it's high time for your weekly links. Most of these were gathered via Twitter, because I follow some fabulous people over there, and they keep finding and doing wonderful things.

    A.C. Wise's monthly post for SF Signal on women to read in SFF is filled with some great recommendations. This post is part of a series, so if you want more recommendations, you'll be able to find them in the related posts links under the article.

    Jim C. Hines is calling for guest posters to write on representation in SFF, so if you think you fit the criteria, you should definitely try and submit something. He's already run a previous series of posts on this subject, which were collected as an ebook, the sales of which have gone to support the Carl Brandon Society's Con or Bust programme. The call for guest posts runs until today, so get in now if you want to be included.

    I'm really looking forward to Aliette de Bodard's new Xuya short story. She's posted an excerpt on her blog.

    This post by Rochita Loenen-Ruiz about the struggles people face when trying to speak up (or even speak at all) is powerful and important.

    Kate Elliott's short-story collection The Very Best of Kate Elliott is out on the 10th February. She's been blogging up a storm recently. I particularly appreciated her guest post at The Book Smugglers on self-rejection and the courage tosay yes.

    Also from Kate Elliott, 'An Illustrated Love Letter to Smart Bitches and Trashy Books', which does exactly what it says on the tin. I'm not a regular reader of Smart Bitches, Trashy Books (which recently celebrated its tenth birthday), but I am a firm believer in unapoletically loving the things you love, and not shaming other people for their fannish choices, so this resonated with me a lot.

    This guest post on Ladybusiness by forestofglory is full of great short-fiction recommendations that I will definitely be checking out.

    Finally, I went on a bit of a Twitter spree about cultish behaviour and abuse dynamics in fandom. These tweets should be considered the preliminary stage of a more detailed post that I've been thinking about for a while. Charles Tan was kind enough to collect my tweets together on Storify.

    Happy Friday, everyone! Enjoy Armenian teenager Vika Ogannesyan singing 'Plava Laguna' (the opera song from The Fifth Element).
    dolorosa_12: (flight of the conchords)
    I know it's a bit late, but I was in Germany without my laptop, and then flat out at work this week, so this is the first chance I've had to post a bunch of links to Yuletide fics. This was my first year participating, and it all went a lot better than I was expecting.

    [archiveofourown.org profile] kmo wrote Ouroboros (Wise Child series, Juniper and Wise Child, gen) for me.

    I wrote one gift fic and one treat, and both were well received, considering they were for very tiny fandoms.

    Beyond the Ninth Wave (Wise Child series, gen). After being driven from their home by Fillan Priest, Juniper and Wise Child adjust to a new life on Finbar's ship.

    Reverberations (Romanitas trilogy, gen). Several years after the events of Savage City, Una, Makaria and Noriko meet. All three feel the effects of the war and slave rebellion in different ways.

    I really enjoyed many of the fics in the collection this year. Here are some of my particular favourites:

    Far from the Blessed Isles by [archiveofourown.org profile] Miss_M (Greek Mythology; Penelope, Circe, Nausicaa, Calypso; T). The dead talked a lot among themselves, there being little else for them to do. Conversation tended to run along circular paths. I love this because it's absolutely unflinching in how it reveals what a raw deal women got in Greek mythology, but still allows these women a space to express their anger about the injustice they experienced.

    The Banishing of Winter by [archiveofourown.org profile] Skeiler (Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrell; John Uskglass; G). In 1202, The Raven King "quarreled with Winter, and banished it from his kingdom so that it enjoyed four years of continual Summer." This is that story. This is absolutely fabulous, managing to retain the whimsical, scholarly tone of the book while also perfectly capturing the spirit of a folk tale.

    The Price of Honor by [archiveofourown.org profile] keilexandra (The Lions of Al-Rassan; Rodrigo Belmonte/Jehane bet Ishak/Ammar ibn Khairan; M). Jehane and Ammar try to make a life for themselves in Muwardi-occupied Al-Rassan. Some things, a very few of them, may be more important than honor. What-if? AU. Warning for implied sexual violence. If this isn't what happened, this is what should have happened. I particularly appreciate that the author managed to resolve the love triangle in a way that still included Rodrigo's wife, Miranda.

    Robbing Peter by [archiveofourown.org profile] cantstoptemplarswillgetme (The Musketeers; d'Artagnan, Porthos, Athos, Aramis, Constance; T). There's no summary, but this is a very silly heist fic, and I thoroughly enjoyed it.

    Somebody's Waiting for Someone by [archiveofourown.org profile] stellatundra (Peaky Blinders; Ada Shelby/Freddie Thorne; T). It might be Tommy he goes to France for, but it’s Ada he comes home for. A Freddie-centric fic examining his relationship with various Shelbys.

    I also loved almost all the Clarke/Bellamy/Raven fics for The 100 fandom.
    dolorosa_12: (teen wolf)
    So, this happened:

     photo ScreenShot2014-09-11at93511PM_zps8e2198b4.png

    I'm not one of those people who turns into an awestruck, quivering heap whenever one of their most admired authors speaks to them, and in any case, I've spoken to Kate Elliott quite a few times before on Twitter or in blog comments (including in comments on one of my reviews of this very series), and she's always been very friendly. However, it is pleasing when an author's understanding of her work lines up with my own.

    This recent Twitter conversation was sparked off by a great conversation I was having with [personal profile] renay over on [community profile] ladybusiness, where she and Jodie had posted their joint review of Spirit Gate, the first book in the Crossroads series. It always makes me very happy to see people discussing this series, as to my mind, it's Elliott's best, and is often neglected by reviewers in favour of her other work (all of which is also fantastic, but didn't speak to me in quite the same way).

    This recent flurry of Crossroads discussion has prompted me to post links to my two reviews of the series, which were written quite a while ago, but may spark more discussion. Here's the review of Spirit Gate and Shadow Gate, which is fairly light on spoilers.

    [I]t reflects a more accurate understanding of how mercantile societies operated, and how such societies might’ve reacted to conflict and war. Mai is a fabulous character, principled yet pragmatic, outwardly restrained but gifted at speaking persuasively when the need arises. It’s been a long time since I’ve met a character in a fantasy novel who appealed to me so much, and it’s been an even longer time since I’ve read a fantasy novel where all elements of the imagined society rang so true.

    Here is the (more spoiler-heavy) review of the final book, Traitor's Gate. I would not advise reading it unless you've finished the series.

    Cut for spoilers )

    I'd love to hear the thoughts of anyone who's finished the series.

    Ynys Môn

    Aug. 25th, 2014 03:03 pm
    dolorosa_12: (ship)
    I've just got back from a pretty fabulous few days in North Wales (mainly Anglesey). My friends B and M were getting married there, and Matthias and I decided to go for a few extra days so that we could have a holiday and visit our other friends in that part of the world, K ([tumblr.com profile] gwehyddarbyd) and P, who had a one-year-old baby boy whom we hadn't met yet.

    It essentially takes half a day to get to Bangor (the nearest train station) from Cambridge, so we arrived late on Wednesday afternoon. We were staying in the hotel that would be the wedding reception venue. This is something we've started doing recently, and it make a huge difference, as it means we're able to stumble on up to bed without worrying about taxis or leaving at a specific time with whoever is giving us a lift. The hotel itself was amazing, and a bit more expensive than we'd normally like, but since this was basically going to be our only holiday this year, we decided it would be okay.

    On the night before the wedding, we met up with some other Cambridge friends, P and R, for drinks in a couple of the (excellent) pubs, and had what was honestly the best (British) Indian meal of my life at this restaurant. Seriously, if you are ever in Beaumaris, go there. It's amazing. I almost can't go back to any other Indian restaurant after this meal, such was its quality.

    The wedding itself was on the Thursday afternoon, so Matthias and I spent the morning wandering around the town. It was fairly typical Welsh weather (i.e. it eventually began pouring with rain), but we managed to take a few photos. It's a very beautiful landscape.

    Photos behind the cut )

    The wedding was in a small chapel in Anglesey, and the service was performed by B's dad, who is a minister. The ceremony was bilingual (with the odd bit of English) - B is a native Welsh speaker, and M is Polish - in Welsh and Polish, with the vows being said in both languages. I speak neither language (though I can understand bits and pieces of Welsh), but the obvious happiness of everyone involved was enough to move me.

    This was followed by the reception, which had some of the most fabulously cheesy music to which I have ever had the pleasure of dancing. We stayed up until about 1.30 or 2am, which wasn't super late, although I regretted it in the morning.

    The next morning, K picked us up from the hotel and we moved in to stay with them for a couple of days. As she and P have a small baby, we mostly had to stay at home, but since I adore small children (and their son is particularly lovely), that was no hardship. We ate lots of delicious food, played a bunch of board games, watched a bit of TV, and mostly basked in the adorableness of the baby. We also went out to Conwy for an afternoon.

    I'd been feeling a bit out of sorts, but a few days away, in such a beautiful landscape, and with such wonderful people, was enough to raise my spirits. It's hard to be unhappy when a small baby dressed in a panda suit is flailing around at you, smiling ecstatically.
    dolorosa_12: (epic internet)
    I saw Guardians of the Galaxy two days ago, and, a couple of quibbles with certain narrative choices aside, thoroughly enjoyed it. I don't really have much to say on the matter, but my friends [tumblr.com profile] jimtheviking and [tumblr.com profile] shinyshoeshaveyouseenmymoves have been having a very interesting conversation about it which I felt was worth sharing. Expect spoilers for the whole film.

    This review of The Magicians by Lev Grossman by Choire Sicha doesn't really make me want to read the series, but makes a couple of points about writing women in fantasy literature that really resonate with me:

    “When I was writing the story in 1969, I knew of no women heroes of heroic fantasy since those in the works of Ariosto and Tasso in the Renaissance. … The women warriors of current fantasy epics,” Le Guin wrote in an afterword of The Tombs of Atuan, “look less like women than like boys in women's bodies in men's armor.” Instead, Le Guin wouldn't play make-believe, and her women were sometimes vulnerable, including physically. She refused to write wish fulfillment, even the wish fulfillment many of us crave.

    The first time I read the Earthsea quartet (as it was then), the stories of Tenar and Tehanu resonated with me in a way that was powerful and profound. I was fourteen or fifteen years old, and I think it was the first time I'd read stories that gave me a glimpse of how terrifying it was going to be to be a woman. They are not easy or comforting stories, and they showed a world that I was about to enter and told me truths I had at that point only dimly understood.

    Here is a post at The Toast by Morgan Leigh Davies about attending the Marvel panel at SDCC. It made me deeply grateful that my fannish interest lies in characters and not actors.

    This post by Mallory Ortberg at The Toast is deeply hilarious:

    Far be it from me to criticize the tactics of modern union organizers, but frankly I think the world was a better place when tradesmen organized to agitate for their rights in the workplace and practice esoteric mind-controlling spells at the same time.

    The Society of the Horseman’s Word was a fraternal secret society that operated in Scotland from the eighteenth through to the twentieth century. Its members were drawn from those who worked with horses, including horse trainers, blacksmiths and ploughmen, and involved the teaching of magical rituals designed to provide the practitioner with the ability to control both horses and women.


    (As an aside, if you're not reading The Toast, you're missing out.)

    Samantha Shannon has some good news. Her Bone Season series was intended as a seven-book series, but Bloomsbury had initially only committed to publishing three. But now they've gone ahead and confirmed that they will publish all seven. Samantha is awesome, as is the series, so I am thrilled.

    Speaking of The Bone Season, I made a Warden/Paige fanmix on 8tracks. I go into more detail about the reasons behind my choice of songs here.

    The [twitter.com profile] PreschoolGems Twitter account is one of the most fabulous things ever to exist on the internet.

    This particular A Softer World gives me life.
    dolorosa_12: (emily hanna)
    I wrote a review on my Wordpress blog about Peaky Blinders, a gangster miniseries set in Birmingham in 1919.

    That’s not to say there aren’t tensions. The young Shelby men have returned, traumatized, from the battlefields of World War I, only to find that the women – shrewd, tough-as-nails Aunt Polly, and angry, romantic Ada – have been running things just fine, if not better, on their own. Tommy Shelby, who views himself as the gang’s de facto leader, has to reconcile his own grand vision for the Peaky Blinders with the more limited, but safer, scope planned by his aunt.

    At the same time, the gang relies on its ability to control the shifting network of alliances of the streets, contending with IRA cells, communist agitators attempting to unionize the factory workers, Traveller families who control the racetrack, Chinese textile workers who moonlight as opium den operators, and, one of my favourite characters, an itinerant fire-and-brimstone street-preacher played by Benjamin Zephaniah. It’s a complicated balancing act of carrot and stick, and when it works, it works because the various players have understood correctly the psychology, needs and fears of their opposite numbers.


    The review's a bit late - the first season aired some months ago - but if my description piques your interest, it might be worth catching up, as there aren't that many episodes, and the new season is due to air soon.

    This is one of my favourite times of the year, because IT'S EUROVISION TIME! I have a deep and daggy love of Eurovision, but luckily, so do my partner Matthias, and many of our friends. This time last year, we had a Eurovision party, but we were unable to do the same this time around, as most of our Eurovision-loving friends were away. Our friend B did come over, and we had a great time snarkily deconstructing all the acts. My greatest triumph of the evening? Inventing the Tumblr tag 'erotic milk-churning' to describe the Polish act. Honestly, it has to be seen to be believed. I was very happy with the act that eventually won, and a good time was had by all.

    ETA: I made a new mix on 8tracks. It's called 'Love Will Tear Us Apart, Again and Again and Again', and consists of the best cover versions of 'Love Will Tear Us Apart', as well as the original. Because I'm cool like that. (Bizarre story from my past: one night, my dad and I did nothing but listen to every cover version of this song, drink red wine and generally work each other up into such a frenzy of maudlin feelings that we both ended up crying our eyes out. Good times, 2007. Good times.)


    Love Will Tear Us Apart, Again and Again and Again from dolorosa_12 on 8tracks Radio.

    dolorosa_12: (sokka)
    So, I wrote a review of Mars Evacuees by [livejournal.com profile] sophiamcdougall. And then this happened...

     photo ScreenShot2014-03-30at123206PM_zps883c9c7b.png

    So, my review convinced one of my favourite authors to read a book by another of my favourites. My work here is done!

    In all seriousness, I would urge you to give Mars Evacuees a try. It's a children's science fiction novel, and the best way I can think to describe it is 'like Pacific Rim, but if the main characters were twelve-year-old girls [and there were many more female characters]'. It shares Pacific Rim's best qualities: optimism, an emphasis on kindness, compromise and empathy in the face of destruction, and a representative, global cast of characters. It's also really, really funny.

    This weekend has been quite busy. Our friends L and C came up on Friday night. Both of them used to live in Cambridge, but they now live in Exeter, where L has a job as a university lecturer. They were visiting because C had her MA ceremony. The Cambridge (and Oxford) MA is a bit of a weird tradition. It's not awarded for completing any course, but rather given as an honorary degree to everyone who has a Cambridge BA degree a certain number of years after they've completed their studies. So, Matthias, who did his undergrad at Cambridge, has a Cambridge MA, but I, who did my undergrad in Australia, will never be eligible for one. In any case, C accidentally had too many tickets to the ceremony, so Matthias and I tagged along with her husband L and her mother and sister. We spent the afternoon after the ceremony catching up with various people, and ended up having a pub dinner.

    This afternoon we'll probably all go walking out to Grantchester, which is a small village just outside Cambridge. It's an absolutely glorious day - 20 degrees, and with enough sunshine to actually cause sunburn. The others are all out having breakfast, but I needed a little break from people before going back to socialising. So I'm just sitting here with the internet, the Daysleepers and a cup of coffee, thinking that life is pretty much fabulous.

    Profile

    dolorosa_12: (Default)
    rushes into my heart and my skull

    July 2017

    S M T W T F S
          1
    2345678
    9101112131415
    1617 1819202122
    23242526272829
    3031     

    Syndicate

    RSS Atom

    Most Popular Tags

    Style Credit

    Expand Cut Tags

    No cut tags
    Page generated Jul. 26th, 2017 02:39 pm
    Powered by Dreamwidth Studios