dolorosa_12: (Default)
This is the obligatory Hugo Awards reaction post. I'll add more links as the appear, but at the moment most of the winners and nominees are probably feeling the aftereffects of last night's celebrations and haven't had time to write anything.

This year was different. There was a sense both of a tipping point, and of a real struggle for the soul of the speculative fiction community. And, as [twitter.com profile] fozmeadows said, the awards results showed that the community turned a corner, and headed in the right direction.

Here is a full breakdown of the voting. I'm feeling particularly gleeful about the result for Novelette.

Here is the writeup by Hannah Ellis-Petersen at The Guardian, which quotes Best Short Story winner John Chu:

Other major winners included John Chu, who won best short story for his deeply personal work The Water that Falls on You from Nowhere, which grapples with questions of sexuality and tradition within a fantasy framework.

Picking up the award, a visibly overwhelmed Chu described the challenges he faced in getting his story published. "I can't begin to describe how much this award means to me," he said. "When I started writing, so many people's words were 'I'm not racist, but …', 'I'm not homophobic, but …' There were so many buts, and they all told me, sometimes in those exact words, that no one was interested and no one would publish anything I would ever write. So to win a Hugo, and for this story, I can't put into words how much that means to me."


John Scalzi's writeup makes some more good points:

[Larry] Correia was foolish to put his own personal capital as a successful and best selling novelist into championing Vox Day and his novelette, because Vox Day is a real bigoted shithole of a human being, and his novelette was, to put it charitably, not good (less charitably: It was like Gene Wolfe strained through a thick and rancid cheesecloth of stupid). Doing that changed the argument from something perfectly legitimate, if debatable — that conservative writers are often ignored for or discounted on award ballots because their personal politics generally conflict with those of the award voters — into a different argument entirely, i.e., fuck you, we got an undeserving bigoted shithole on the Hugo ballot, how you like them apples.

Which is a shame. It’s fine for Correia to beclown himself with Day, if such is his joy, and he deserves to reap the fruits of such an association. I suspect, however, there are others whom he championed for his “sad puppy” slate who were less thrilled to find themselves looped in with Day by involuntary association.


I am most happy about Ancillary Justice winning Best Novel. It's the best book I've read all year, and I'm thrilled that it swept the board of speculative fiction awards. A most deserved win.

I was also very happy about the nominees for Best Fan Writer, and to be honest, wished that all five could've won. But Kameron Hurley is a truly deserving winner, and her second Hugo for Best Related Work was just icing on the cake. (Speaking of which, if you haven't yet read 'We Have Always Fought', go out and do so now.

I'll leave you with a quote from Hurley's acceptance speech, which was read by [livejournal.com profile] kateelliott:

The conflict of narrative we’re engaged in online, in convention spaces, in stories, and in the wider world is a real one. It’s no less than a struggle for our inclusion in our own history. Not just my history, my future. But yours. Your friends’. Your colleagues. All of us, struggling together to write a better, truer story.

Tell them stories indeed.
dolorosa_12: (epic internet)
I've been really busy lately, which is why I haven't posted for ages and ages. I have two very good excuses, however:

1. My PhD viva is in just a week. I'm actually feeling quite calm about it, which surprises me, but I seem to have given myself the attitude that there is nothing I can do now to change how the viva goes - as the examiners already have my thesis and I can't alter it - so I might as well not worry. I imagine I'll be a nervous wreck next Monday, though.

2. I have a new job! It's only temporary and part-time, but it is in another academic library in Cambridge, it's a step up from my current library job* (I'm learning how to catalogue, and my job title is library assistant rather than library invigilator) and it's come along at a really good time, as I don't get money from my PhD scholarship funding body any more and was really worried about what I was going to do for money. So far I'm really liking it, although it's very different to my other library job, and I've had to cut back my hours there, which is sad as I really love working there.

I have a bunch of links, although I must admit that some of them are very old and you're likely to have encountered them already. These are more for personal reference so that I can find them again, and close some tabs on my laptop and iPad. The first, however, is a link to my latest post on my review blog. It's mainly a review of Laini Taylor's Daughter of Smoke and Bone, but also talks more broadly about the (published and unpublished) wish-fulfillment fantasies of teenage girls and whether such things are valuable or dangerous (or both, or neither).

As someone who wrote a story about her book boyfriend being in love with her idealised character, I have a lot of sympathy for teenage (and not-so-teenage) wish-fulfillment fantasies depicting their protagonists being pursued by a multitude of love interests. It’s a powerful trope for girls who may be feeling unlovable or simply baffled at how to have romantic relationships. However, this desire to be desired should not be portrayed at the expense of functional friendships among teenage girls. Portraying all female relationships as inherently competitive and antagonistic creates a self-fulfilling prophecy in the real world whereby girls and women view all other girls and women with suspicion, undermining one another instead of supporting each other.

The Dreamwidth community [community profile] ladybusiness is not new, but it is new to me, and I point it out here to those of you who are interested in reading (or participating in) thoughtful discussion about female characters in a variety of media. There are podcasts, linkspams and lengthy meta posts. At some point when I have more time, I'm going to read through all the archives. I recommend it highly.

Speaking of podcasts, this speech by Maciej Cegłowsk, the creator of Pinboard, about fandom is thoughtful and well worth a listen. It's an old link, and I can't remember where I saw it first, but if you haven't heard it yet I would encourage you to do so.

This link is more for my own future reference, and I haven't actually read through all its content yet. It's a series of posts on Making Light about dysfunctional families, and looks as if it will be really interesting. I'm saving it for after the viva.

On a related note, this post about so-called 'Ask Culture and Guess Culture' had me nodding my head a lot. I don't know if there's any data to back up its assertions, but I can certainly recognise elements of this phenomenon in my own life.

In some families, you grow up with the expectation that it’s OK to ask for anything at all, but you gotta realize you might get no for an answer. This is Ask Culture.

In Guess Culture, you avoid putting a request into words unless you’re pretty sure the answer will be yes. Guess Culture depends on a tight net of shared expectations. A key skill is putting out delicate feelers. If you do this with enough subtlety, you won’t even have to make the request directly; you’ll get an offer. Even then, the offer may be genuine or pro forma; it takes yet more skill and delicacy to discern whether you should accept.

All kinds of problems spring up around the edges. If you’re a Guess Culture person — and you obviously are — then unwelcome requests from Ask Culture people seem presumptuous and out of line, and you’re likely to feel angry, uncomfortable, and manipulated.

If you’re an Ask Culture person, Guess Culture behavior can seem incomprehensible, inconsistent, and rife with passive aggression.

Obviously she’s an Ask and you’re a Guess. (I’m a Guess too. Let me tell you, it’s great for, say, reading nuanced and subtle novels; not so great for, say, dating and getting raises.)

Thing is, Guess behaviors only work among a subset of other Guess people — ones who share a fairly specific set of expectations and signalling techniques. The farther you get from your own family and friends and subculture, the more you’ll have to embrace Ask behavior. Otherwise you’ll spend your life in a cloud of mild outrage at (pace Moomin fans) the Cluelessness of Everyone.


I am definitely from a Guess Culture family (you were never supposed to ask for things unless they were the right things, the things that people would say yes to, and there were so many subtle ways to hint at what you wanted to ask, figure out whether the answer would be yes or not, or, from the other side, hint at whether or not you were going to say yes; it was considered indescribably selfish and rude to state preferences for e.g. food or drink options at other people's houses (the only acceptable answers were 'whatever everyone else is having' or 'whatever is already open'); and so on). My partner is very much of the Ask Culture school. It's easier now that we've been together for years, but at the beginning of our relationship (and indeed, in many other of my romantic and friendship relationships) I used to work myself up into a hysterical level of anxiety whenever I was required to ask for anything directly or given options to state a preference (because the asker wasn't hinting properly about what answer they wanted from me!). I'm told that this has the potential to come across as being very passive-aggressive, and if it's true that it is some sort of culture clash, a lot of things about my interactions with other people make a whole lot more sense!

Tumblr user thefrenemy posted this great defence of the selfie.

I hate with a boiling passion 99% of all of these photos, all of these memories of my life documented on film. Every time I get a notification on my Facebook saying that somebody added a picture of me, I get an actual nervous feeling in my stomach. Like, oh great, let me take some time out of my day to analyze my body and feel like shit about myself! I check the picture. I get taken out of the wonderful moment it was taken in to nitpick my flaws. Ew, I hate my face. Ew, I hate my tummy. Ew, my arms. Ew, ew, ew.

[...]

I think I look like a goddess in my selfies. I think I look like Dolly Parton, a witch, and pretty much every street blogger rolled into one. They make me feel absolutely fabulous and alive and gorgeous. I rarely feel this way and when I do, it’s because it’s exactly how I want to look for me. It’s exactly the way I’ve always wanted to look and felt I could look without all that loud noise about how I should look better. It is the evidence, the proof positive, that there are moments we can feel and look fan-fucking-tastic in our own eyes. That alone is worth its weight in gold.


I have nothing to add.

As a final link, have John Scalzi's predictions for the Oscars. He's not always right, but his reasoning is always pretty solid and I appreciate that he predicts what he thinks what will win as well as stating what he thinks should win.

_____________
*Although it actually pays less, which is a pain.
dolorosa_12: by ginnystar on lj (robin marian)
My department is on Tumblr. If you like medieval geekery, and are on Tumblr, you should check it out! In related news, my boyfriend and a friend of ours have started up a blog where they translate Old English riddles and write commentary about them. (For those of you so inclined, Tolkien probably had these kinds of riddles in mind when writing the famous scene in The Hobbit.)

I'm reading The Iliad. I thought it was about time, considering how many adaptations and reworkings I've read (let us not speak of That Travesty of a Movie), including studying a course call The Literature of Troy as a undergrad (which looked at the medieval and Shakespearean versions of the story of Troilus and Cressida). I knew the basic shape of the story, I knew what happened, and yet I still found it extremely confronting to read. The problem was, I inevitably latched onto Briseis. That got me thinking about my whole way of reading/interacting with texts these days. I'm much more alert to issues of agency and voice, which characters are given words and which remain silent. So while I wasn't surprised by the presentation of Briseis, I feel very protective of her as a character, and I want very much to read adaptations of the Iliad that give her a voice. (My first port of call was fanfiction, but I found nothing, other than some stuff based on That Travesty of a Movie. Inevitably, Iliad fandom is all about the Achilles/Patroclus slash, and even more inevitably, Hector/Paris.) In any case, I need to think more about these things, and possibly write something more than these rambly musings.

Horrible Histories author Terry Deary wrote a diatribe against libraries. Foz Meadows wrote a powerful response:

And then, of course, there’s the moral/historical angle: “Because it’s been 150 years, we’ve got this idea that we’ve got an entitlement to read books for free, at the expense of authors, publishers and council tax payers,” Deary moans. “This is not the Victorian age, when we wanted to allow the impoverished access to literature. We pay for compulsory schooling to do that.”

The bolding above is my own, and it’s there for a reason. Take a good, long look at that sentence – specifically, at the crucial use and placement of the word wanted, whose past tense indicates that allowing the impoverished access to literature is something we don’t want to do any longer; or rather, that Deary believes we shouldn’t. There’s so much wrong with this statement that I hardly know where to begin. With the fact that, under Deary’s ideal system, the poor are only entitled to literature while they’re of school age, perhaps? With the fact that most of the literary benefit one experiences while a student comes, not from English class, but the school library? Or how about the novel idea that treating support of literacy in poverty as a quirky Victorian prerogative rather than an ongoing social necessity is not only morally repugnant, but incredibly shortsighted when one depends for one’s living on the existence of a literate, interested populace?


John Scalzi also responded:

I don’t use my local library like I used libraries when I was younger. But I want my local library, in no small part because I recognize that I am fortunate not to need my local library — but others do, and my connection with humanity extends beyond the front door of my house. My life was indisputably improved because those before me decided to put those libraries there. It would be stupid and selfish and shortsighted of me to declare, after having wrung all I could from them, that they serve no further purpose, or that the times have changed so much that they are obsolete. My library is used every single day that it is open, by the people who live here, children to senior citizens. They use the building, they use the Internet, they use the books. This is, as it happens, the exact opposite of what “obsolete” means. I am glad my library is here and I am glad to support it.

Every time I publish a new book — every time — the first hardcover copy goes to my wife and the second goes to the Bradford library. First because it makes me happy to do it: I love the idea of my book being in my library. Second because that means the library doesn’t have to spend money to buy my book, and can then use it to buy the book of another author — a small but nice way of paying it forward. Third because I wouldn’t be a writer without libraries, hard stop, end of story. Which means I wouldn’t have the life I have without libraries, hard stop, end of story.

I am, in no small part, the sum of what all those libraries I have listed above have made me. When I give my books to my local library, it’s my way of saying: Thank you. For all of it.


My own library story is similar, but different. What I will say is this: libraries gave me words. They gave me the words to understand myself, my space in the world, the people around me. They opened doors, they opened my mind, but it all comes back to the words. They gave me my voice.
dolorosa_12: (dreaming)
1. If she goes for a long time without running, and combines this with a long time forgetting to take her iron tablets and consuming Vitamin C-heavy foods, she turns into a hysterical, freaking-out-to-the-point-of-curling-up-in-the-foetal-position wreck.

2. However, ASNaCs are the kindest people in the world and will always be there when she needs a shoulder to cry on, a hug, or a cookie.

3. Also, her supervisor, when she's on the warpath, is the best kind of avenging angel to have on your side.

Links and stuff )
dolorosa_12: (dreaming)
1. If she goes for a long time without running, and combines this with a long time forgetting to take her iron tablets and consuming Vitamin C-heavy foods, she turns into a hysterical, freaking-out-to-the-point-of-curling-up-in-the-foetal-position wreck.

2. However, ASNaCs are the kindest people in the world and will always be there when she needs a shoulder to cry on, a hug, or a cookie.

3. Also, her supervisor, when she's on the warpath, is the best kind of avenging angel to have on your side.

Links and stuff )
dolorosa_12: (Default)
The internet! What a marvel it is! So full of wondrous and interesting things! Things that make me go !!!, apparently!

There is [livejournal.com profile] papersky's review of Dune! And Ursula Le Guin's thoughts on a female Prospero! (I love Le Guin, and The Tempest is my favourite Shakespeare play, so this induced a swoon of geektastic proportions!)

We've got a couple of insightful posts about the Arizona shooting on Tiger Beatdown, while John Scalzi's written some good stuff about Sarah Palin's 'blood libel' comments. He's also got an open thread about Obama's Tucson speech.

Now, in case anyone needs a unicorn chaser of sorts, Neil Gaiman and Amber Benson are in the same place. Be still my geeky, geeky heart.
dolorosa_12: (Default)
The internet! What a marvel it is! So full of wondrous and interesting things! Things that make me go !!!, apparently!

There is [livejournal.com profile] papersky's review of Dune! And Ursula Le Guin's thoughts on a female Prospero! (I love Le Guin, and The Tempest is my favourite Shakespeare play, so this induced a swoon of geektastic proportions!)

We've got a couple of insightful posts about the Arizona shooting on Tiger Beatdown, while John Scalzi's written some good stuff about Sarah Palin's 'blood libel' comments. He's also got an open thread about Obama's Tucson speech.

Now, in case anyone needs a unicorn chaser of sorts, Neil Gaiman and Amber Benson are in the same place. Be still my geeky, geeky heart.
dolorosa_12: (flight of the conchords)
It's not often that I I go to sleep and wake up with a new Prime Minister. (Also, I know we're not meant to talk about this stuff, but I haven't seen Julia Gillard in a year or so, and she's got a MUCH IMPROVED new haircut.) As I was saying to various people, I quite like Gillard, and I've always thought it would be cool to have a female PM, but I don't understand what it is that Rudd did wrong. I quite liked him too. It's weird finding this stuff out second-hand, and living at such a remove from Australian politics.

This is just awful. Copyfighting is NOT extremism.

Emma's report on Supanova makes me wish again that I was back in Sydney.

I really like John Scalzi's post about being self-aware of your own incompetence.

Here's a link to a rather old post by me on the Radio National Bookshow Blog about [livejournal.com profile] sarahtales's book launch for The Demon's Covenant.

I've had only two hours' sleep, and I'm meant to be working at Kumon in an hour and a half. Eeek.
That's it, I think.
dolorosa_12: (flight of the conchords)
It's not often that I I go to sleep and wake up with a new Prime Minister. (Also, I know we're not meant to talk about this stuff, but I haven't seen Julia Gillard in a year or so, and she's got a MUCH IMPROVED new haircut.) As I was saying to various people, I quite like Gillard, and I've always thought it would be cool to have a female PM, but I don't understand what it is that Rudd did wrong. I quite liked him too. It's weird finding this stuff out second-hand, and living at such a remove from Australian politics.

This is just awful. Copyfighting is NOT extremism.

Emma's report on Supanova makes me wish again that I was back in Sydney.

I really like John Scalzi's post about being self-aware of your own incompetence.

Here's a link to a rather old post by me on the Radio National Bookshow Blog about [livejournal.com profile] sarahtales's book launch for The Demon's Covenant.

I've had only two hours' sleep, and I'm meant to be working at Kumon in an hour and a half. Eeek.
That's it, I think.
dolorosa_12: (captain haddock)
So, it's a linkspam post. Yay?

The Last Muggle has finally finished reading the whole Harry Potter series. I've linked to the last of her 'Finished!' posts; there are ten, plus an epilogue and prologue. I've absolutely adored reading her blog. It reminds me so much of what it felt like to read the series for the first time, when everything was so fresh and desperate and mysterious.

I love Scalzi's post about what he would do if he had the power to rewrite the US constitution.

I also love [livejournal.com profile] grrm's post in response the passing of the US healthcare bill:

'I find it telling that virtually ALL the posters from Canada, Australia, New Zealand, the UK, France, Italy, Spain, and other countries that have a single payer national health care service LIKE their national health plan, and would NOT trade it for the American model. Meanwhile, here in the US, we are clearly split right down the middle. (Probably along the usual Blue State/ Red State lines, I suspect). Speaking for myself, I would gladly trade our present health care system -- even with the Obama fixes -- for a Canadian or Australian model. I'd do it tomorrow, without hesitation. So would millions of other Americans.

Now I ask you: if there are two restaurants, one where 99% of the customers are satisfied and happy, and one where half the customers are happy and the other half profoundly unhappy with the food and service, which would you rather eat at? '


Quite.

This post by the Intern made me fall off my chair laughing, while this interview with her was very informative.

The last link, which I hesitate to put in with all these other links to wonderful things, is to one of my own blog posts. It's about my favourite fictional couples. I'd love it if people would comment about their own, as I've noticed a weird trend with mine: they're ALL (with one or two exceptions) from YA books. Why? I don't really know. Perhaps I find adult romantic relationships boring? (That's a terrifying thought.)
dolorosa_12: (Default)
It's odd when you return from an internet-free weekend to find out that Epic Drama of Epicness has been unfolding online. But that's what happened with the latest round of Amazon vs the Publishers/Authors/Readers/People Who Are Dubious About the Kindle.

I'm not really sure of my opinion about the matter, and I think there's blame on both sides, but I'll let you all make up your own minds with a series of posts by John Scalzi about the fight between Amazon and Macmillan over the price of ebooks. As usual, half the good stuff takes place in the comments of the posts. Scalzi is as erudite as ever, summing up the situation (as he sees it) with wit and knowledge. Charles Stross sums up matters as he sees it, while Tobias Buckell gives us his take. Of course, the Tor editors are all over it. Scott Westerfeld's take on the matter contains the hilarious observation that Amazon should've known that 'when cutting off publishers, don’t start with the one that has the most science fiction writers. We will blog you dead!' I couldn't agree more!

[ETA: I knew that Hal Duncan wouldn't disappoint.]

And now for something completely different! Jo Walton's written some great posts on the first three Earthsea books, A Wizard of Earthsea, The Tombs of Atuan and The Farthest Shore. She (and her commenters) make some really interesting points about Le Guin's fabulous series. I, for one, have been saying for years that Le Guin's work is cold; she's not a comforting or consoling writer, and yet somehow that's a far greater consolation than a more 'cozy' book might be. Earthsea never talks down to its readers, and as the series progresses, you can see Le Guin seriously engaging with, reflecting on and realising the limitations of her own philosophy. She saw the flaws in her own books (especially in regard to feminism) and corrected them accordingly. It's a brave author who can do that!

Okay, over and out!
dolorosa_12: (Default)
It's odd when you return from an internet-free weekend to find out that Epic Drama of Epicness has been unfolding online. But that's what happened with the latest round of Amazon vs the Publishers/Authors/Readers/People Who Are Dubious About the Kindle.

I'm not really sure of my opinion about the matter, and I think there's blame on both sides, but I'll let you all make up your own minds with a series of posts by John Scalzi about the fight between Amazon and Macmillan over the price of ebooks. As usual, half the good stuff takes place in the comments of the posts. Scalzi is as erudite as ever, summing up the situation (as he sees it) with wit and knowledge. Charles Stross sums up matters as he sees it, while Tobias Buckell gives us his take. Of course, the Tor editors are all over it. Scott Westerfeld's take on the matter contains the hilarious observation that Amazon should've known that 'when cutting off publishers, don’t start with the one that has the most science fiction writers. We will blog you dead!' I couldn't agree more!

[ETA: I knew that Hal Duncan wouldn't disappoint.]

And now for something completely different! Jo Walton's written some great posts on the first three Earthsea books, A Wizard of Earthsea, The Tombs of Atuan and The Farthest Shore. She (and her commenters) make some really interesting points about Le Guin's fabulous series. I, for one, have been saying for years that Le Guin's work is cold; she's not a comforting or consoling writer, and yet somehow that's a far greater consolation than a more 'cozy' book might be. Earthsea never talks down to its readers, and as the series progresses, you can see Le Guin seriously engaging with, reflecting on and realising the limitations of her own philosophy. She saw the flaws in her own books (especially in regard to feminism) and corrected them accordingly. It's a brave author who can do that!

Okay, over and out!
dolorosa_12: (Default)
I've been writing epically recently, not only online, but also for my PhD. I'm now sitting on about 2000 words, which pleases me immensely. But today I'd like to show you some of my less academic writing.

First, here's my (supposedly) weekly Longvision post. It's about Christian symbolism and the character of Sulien, and it's the sort of thing I wish I could spend more time pondering.

I've got two posts on Geata Póeg na Déanainn. The first is just a general post about life in Cambridge this term - my regular update that sums up the Cambridge experience in a more formal way than I do on this blog. The second post is a review of Kate Elliott's Crossroads series. It might be slightly spoilery for the first two books. The focus is on Elliott's positive depiction of middle-class characters in a medieval world, which is something of a rarity in fantasy literature.

I've got a couple more links for you. First up, something I stumbled upon through [livejournal.com profile] metafandom. It's a rather interesting post pondering the appeal of the Twilight series, which, as you know, is something I ponder myself from time to time. I think you'll be interested in the conclusions the blogger reaches.

If you're not reading The Intern, a fantastically snarky look at the publishing world, you should be. Her recent post on author websites had me wondering whether to laugh or cry. As someone who has struggled recently trying to track down authors' publicity representatives in order to get review copies of books sent to me, let me reiterate The Intern's complaints: Authors! Fix your websites! Most importantly, include a link to your representatives at each of your publishing companies, with contact details! You would make this reviewer very grateful.

Check out John Scalzi's remarks on Fox 'News' and Obama. He's spot on as usual.

I discovered, via Justine Larbalestier's blog, the wonderful [livejournal.com profile] sarahtales (author Sarah Rees Brennan). She's got some very interesting things to say on the double standards readers tend to hold in relation to female characters. It's good food for thought.

That's probably enough for you to be going on with for now!
dolorosa_12: (Default)
I've been writing epically recently, not only online, but also for my PhD. I'm now sitting on about 2000 words, which pleases me immensely. But today I'd like to show you some of my less academic writing.

First, here's my (supposedly) weekly Longvision post. It's about Christian symbolism and the character of Sulien, and it's the sort of thing I wish I could spend more time pondering.

I've got two posts on Geata Póeg na Déanainn. The first is just a general post about life in Cambridge this term - my regular update that sums up the Cambridge experience in a more formal way than I do on this blog. The second post is a review of Kate Elliott's Crossroads series. It might be slightly spoilery for the first two books. The focus is on Elliott's positive depiction of middle-class characters in a medieval world, which is something of a rarity in fantasy literature.

I've got a couple more links for you. First up, something I stumbled upon through [livejournal.com profile] metafandom. It's a rather interesting post pondering the appeal of the Twilight series, which, as you know, is something I ponder myself from time to time. I think you'll be interested in the conclusions the blogger reaches.

If you're not reading The Intern, a fantastically snarky look at the publishing world, you should be. Her recent post on author websites had me wondering whether to laugh or cry. As someone who has struggled recently trying to track down authors' publicity representatives in order to get review copies of books sent to me, let me reiterate The Intern's complaints: Authors! Fix your websites! Most importantly, include a link to your representatives at each of your publishing companies, with contact details! You would make this reviewer very grateful.

Check out John Scalzi's remarks on Fox 'News' and Obama. He's spot on as usual.

I discovered, via Justine Larbalestier's blog, the wonderful [livejournal.com profile] sarahtales (author Sarah Rees Brennan). She's got some very interesting things to say on the double standards readers tend to hold in relation to female characters. It's good food for thought.

That's probably enough for you to be going on with for now!
dolorosa_12: (captain haddock)
I haven't had time to write anything today because I've been too busy moving house and agonising over what the hell to do with my life. Since I don't want to bore you with those details, have some links instead.

Here's a great post about the Buffy the Vampire Slayer film. I haven't seen the film, but conventional thinking about it among Whedonistas is that it was a flawed movie that failed to capture Whedon's vision.

John Scalzi and Neil Gaiman act like excited fanboys after meeting one another for the first time at Worldcon. I wish I was there. The comments on Scalzi's blog are, as always, hilarious.

Justine Larbalestier managed to get her cover changed on her book Liar. You may recall that I wrote about this a little while ago, and I am delighted that Bloomsbury changed their tune and are committing to ending the whitewashing of book covers.
dolorosa_12: (captain haddock)
I haven't had time to write anything today because I've been too busy moving house and agonising over what the hell to do with my life. Since I don't want to bore you with those details, have some links instead.

Here's a great post about the Buffy the Vampire Slayer film. I haven't seen the film, but conventional thinking about it among Whedonistas is that it was a flawed movie that failed to capture Whedon's vision.

John Scalzi and Neil Gaiman act like excited fanboys after meeting one another for the first time at Worldcon. I wish I was there. The comments on Scalzi's blog are, as always, hilarious.

Justine Larbalestier managed to get her cover changed on her book Liar. You may recall that I wrote about this a little while ago, and I am delighted that Bloomsbury changed their tune and are committing to ending the whitewashing of book covers.
dolorosa_12: (daria)
John Scalzi's response to the idiot who emailed him, demanding to know why Scalzi hadn't informed the world that Neil Gaiman and Amanda Palmer are dating.

Umm, entitlement issues, much?

EDIT: Also, a really excellent post by Justine Larbalestier about why we shouldn't be panicking so much about boys and reading. She rightly points out that boys are reading. They're just not necessarily reading novels.
dolorosa_12: (daria)
John Scalzi's response to the idiot who emailed him, demanding to know why Scalzi hadn't informed the world that Neil Gaiman and Amanda Palmer are dating.

Umm, entitlement issues, much?

EDIT: Also, a really excellent post by Justine Larbalestier about why we shouldn't be panicking so much about boys and reading. She rightly points out that boys are reading. They're just not necessarily reading novels.
dolorosa_12: (flight of the conchords)
I'm actually in a very good place, dissertation-wise. I've written the whole thing. All I need to do is add in a little bit about Purgatory and tighten up my arguments about Anselm's letters to Irish bishops, and it is fit for human consumption.

But until then, I'll continue to bring you your daily dose of linkage.

Ronni gets wordy )

I can't stop listening to Nightwish.
dolorosa_12: (flight of the conchords)
I'm actually in a very good place, dissertation-wise. I've written the whole thing. All I need to do is add in a little bit about Purgatory and tighten up my arguments about Anselm's letters to Irish bishops, and it is fit for human consumption.

But until then, I'll continue to bring you your daily dose of linkage.

Ronni gets wordy )

I can't stop listening to Nightwish.

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rushes into my heart and my skull

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