dolorosa_12: (doctor horrible)
So, I woke up to the news that Theresa May has described EU migrants in the UK as 'queue jumpers' (or, to be more precise, that making use of — entirely legal — EU freedom of movement rights is somehow jumping a non-existent migration queue) and implied that most of them are worthless people whom Britain has been forced to accept at the expense of hordes of highly skilled non-EU migrants such as 'software developers from Dehli' and 'engineers from Sydney'. Moving on from the utterly despicable ploy of trying to pit different groups of migrants against each other (and make British people sort us into categories of 'good' and 'bad' migrants), Theresa May in her capacity as Home Secretary oversaw most of the law changes that made it more and more difficult as a non-EU migrant to migrate to the UK, even more difficult to stay here permanently if you'd migrated on a temporary student or work visa, and vastly more expensive to apply for all visas, so it's a bit rich for her to suddenly deplore this situation as if it were out of her control. She's trying to make it seem as if the EU is to blame for this state of affairs, whereas in fact non-EU migration has always been something for individual countries to handle according to whatever laws they set. And let me tell you, as a non-EU migrant who's lived in the UK for ten years, I have a pretty good idea what sort of welcome her hypothetical Indian software developer and Australian engineer are likely to get from the UK government, and it is an expensive, stressful and hostile one.

At virtually the same time, the prime minister of my country of origin (Australia) made some ghastly statement about migrants being to blame for overcrowded schools and traffic jams, clearly gearing up for an election that's going to be fought on ugly anti-immigration terms. (In Australia, these kinds of elections are ... not good. Not that I think there is a good kind of anti-immigration election campaign.) When Morrison came to power (a few months ago, in the revolving door of opinion poll results paranoia, backstabbing, and coal industry manipulation that has been Australian federal politics for the past decade), I posted despairingly on Facebook that any upcoming election would now be fought on despicable, anti-immigration grounds, and most of my Australian friends and family handwaved my concerns away, or said that it would be over quickly (Australian election campaigns are, thankfully, brief) and Labor would win, anyway. It gives me no pleasure to constantly be right about this kind of thing, but here we are.

I'm so tired of it being acceptable to give migrants a good rhetorical kicking whenever political leaders are looking threatened in opinion polls or within their own parties. I'm so tired of us being talked about as if we're thieves and parasites whose very presence in the countries we've made our homes is illegitimate, a drain on resources we have no right to access. I'm so fed up with this going largely unchallenged, other than in outraged Twitter threads or a few hand-wringing op-eds in The Guardian or similar places. And I'm so tired of being told to have empathy for people's 'legitimate concerns' about migration when those same people are never told to spare a scrap of thought for the experiences of the migrants who have made a home beside them.
dolorosa_12: (sokka)
Before I start, a few things to contextualise this for non-Australians:
  • The conservative party in Australia is called the Liberal Party

  • The Liberal Party (or, more correctly, the coalition between the Liberals and the National Party (rural conservative party) is currently in government in Australia, but they only had a majority of one in the lower house of parliament

  • When the party ousted its former leader, Malcolm Turnbull (who was believed by the hardliners of the party to be too socially progressive to appeal to the apparently vast hordes of far-right racists they felt were their voting base), Turnbull announced he was resigning his parliamentary seat, meaning there would need to be a bye-election in his former electorate, Wentworth (in the wealthy eastern suburbs of Sydney — incidentally I have occasionally been a voter in Wentworth, although they're constantly changing the electoral boundaries and I'm not in that electorate at the moment)

  • In ousting Turnbull, his party has continued the now decade-old tradition of no Australian prime minister since 2007 serving a full (three-year) term

  • The person who replaced Turnbull as leader and Prime Minister is Scott Morrison, a fundamentalist Christian, social conservative, and former immigration minister who was responsible for escalating Australia's vile treatment of refugees


  • In any case, the bye-election was today (Saturday). All elections in Australia are held on Saturdays.

    In spite of the fact that Wentworth is an electorate which has been held by the Liberal Party since Federation in 1901, there was clearly a lot of concern that the result was in doubt. Given I'm out of the country and not a Wentworth voter, I haven't been paying that much attention to the campaign, but my impression was that voters all across Australia are massively fed up with the Liberals, Wentworth voters, who tend to be the sort of 'socially progressive, economically conservative' type of wealthy big city residents were incensed by the ousting of Turnbull (and also had a lot of residual irritation about the marriage equality postal survey last year), and everyone was supremely annoyed by the soap operatic, farcical psychodrama with a revolving door of prime ministers that Australian politics has become. Kerryn Phelps, a left-of-centre independent, stood as a candidate in the bye-election.

    Scott Morrison, clearly fearing the worst, did a stupid stunt clearly designed to appeal to the large Orthodox Jewish community living in Wentworth. On Monday he announced an absurd scheme to move the Australian embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. This backfired spectacularly: Indonesia, one of Australia's biggest trading partners, was outraged and announced it planned to pull out of a proposed trade deal. And to complete the ridiculousness of the whole thing, as any sharp-eyed reader will already have realised, to announce this on a Monday in advance of an election that was due to take place on the Saturday of the same week to appeal to Orthodox Jewish voters was completely pointless: no observant Jewish people are going to vote on Shabbat, and so would already have voted by post before the Monday announcement!

    So, to sum things up, the Liberals demonstrated that they knew nothing about Judaism, lacked awareness of a large voting bloc in an electorate due to have a bye-election that might affect their parliamentary majority, and alienated a major trade partner, all in an attempt to win an election in an electorate they've held comfortably since 1901...

    ...and they lost. Kerryn Phelps is now the Member for Wentworth, and Australia has a hung parliament.

    The schadenfreude. It is glorious.
    dolorosa_12: (doctor horrible)
  • Marriage equality has been passed into law in Australia (in spite of some histrionics by conservative politicians attempting to stall things by trying to make absurd 'religious freedom' amendments before the bill was passed; thankfully these were all voted down), and the first same-sex couples have given notice of their intent to marry today. There's a one-month notice period, which means the first marriages will happen in early January next year. I'm glad we have marriage equality at last, but my heart hurts at the convoluted and cruel way it was achieved, and the fact that Malcolm Turnbull (and, even worse, Tony Abbott) are claiming credit for this makes my blood boil.


  • In other Australian news, the horrific blight that is imprisoning refugees on Manus Island and Nauru continues. Behrouz Boochani, a Kurdish refugee and journalist who has been held on Manus since 2014, has been an eloquent and vital voice of the resistance, and his latest piece, published in The Saturday Paper, is well worth a read. I urge any Australians reading this to contact both their MPs and Malcolm Turnbull and request that the refugees be moved as soon as possible to a safe country and the camps on Manus and Nauru be closed.


  • Brexit shambles on. I have to admit I greeted the news of the 'sufficient progress' statement with hysterical laughter. All that posturing, all those lies and nationalistic chest-thumping, and the result, is, apparently, that we're going to end up like Switzerland. I notice that all the Brexiteers are the ones suddenly bellowing for a second referendum.


  • Patreon made some changes to how it will handle payments, and these changes seem likely to screw over the vast majority of its user base. There have been calls to make formal complaints and sign petitions, but my feeling is that nothing will make them revert back to the way things were before. As I said on Twitter, platforms not created by and maintained by the community they're designed to serve will always eventually change in ways that render them unusable by that community. The only guarantee that your chosen platforms will continue to work in ways that suit your needs is to build them yourself, or have them built by people from your community, sadly. I'm very sorry for all the creators and patrons who have been affected by this.


  • In slightly happier news, I finished another Yuletide treat, which means I've hit the writing targets I set for myself this year. I might poke around the requests summary and see if any other requests take my fancy.


  • It's going to snow tomorrow in Cambridge, and I am very pleased about that.


  • Edited to add: it did snow! Here are a photoset and a video that I took.
  • dolorosa_12: (Default)
    I would appreciate this post being shared, whether you are Australian or not.

    Every morning this week I've woken up to increasingly terrible news from Manus Island, one of the locations of Australia's so-called 'offshore processing' of refugees seeking asylum in Australia. The situation is becoming desperate, and I'm seriously concerned for the wellbeing and safety of the hundreds of men held on Manus.

    Before I go on, a content warning for human rights violations, violence, deprivation and trauma.

    The refugees held there had been refusing to move from their current 'residence' (I use the term loosely) to another — in fear for their safety, and also due to the fact that the new 'residence' is not adequate (many of the rooms are simply shipping containers without windows). They have been protesting for three weeks. During this time, they have been deprived of food, water and electricity. They have rigged up a generator, and have been collecting rainwater in rubbish bins and rationing it out. As you can imagine, hygiene conditions are poor, and medical professionals have warned they are at serious risk of disease. The PNG authorities keep knocking over the collected water, as well as fouling it with mud to make it undrinkable. Most of the men were also on various forms of medication, but they have been denied access to this, as well as access to healthcare professionals of any kind; one man went into cardiac arrest and had to be helped over the phone by a doctor from Australia, and treated with nothing more than aspirin. Another man had severe pain from kidney stones, and another is suffering from diabetes. There are reports that the men formerly taking antidepressants have resorted to drinking 20 cups of coffee a day to replicate the effects.

    Yesterday, the PNG authorities raided the camp, forcibly moving several busloads of the men to the new 'residence', as well as detaining the ringleaders of this impromptu resistence movement. Behrouz Boochani, a journalist and refugee from Iran, seems to have been deliberately targetted; he was detained and kept in handcuffs for two hours, and several of his fellow ringleaders were tweeting that the authorities were searching for them too. Although Boochani was released, he and the rest of his fellow protesters were forcibly moved last night (UK time). They were beaten with sticks and metal rods, and their belongings were destroyed. The new 'residences' are, as suspected, inadequate. There aren't enough beds -- many of the refugees have been forced to sleep on the floors of other people's rooms -- and there is no running water or electricity, including in the toilets. The locals have blocked the roads, meaning no food, water, or other supplies can get in or out.

    We cannot let this go on. It shames us as Australians. The majority of these men have been found to be geniune refugees, and their resilience, resourcefulness, and compassion for each other should mean Australia would be lucky to have them. New Zealand has indicated that they would be willing to take several hundred of these refugees, but Australia is refusing to allow this. We must speak out. Imagine if these were your brothers, your husbands, your fathers or your sons. I don't have to imagine — MY father, like Behrouz Boochani, is a journalist, and it absolutely chills me to think of people in his field of work suffering like this. For those of you who think of these refugees as illegitimate 'queue jumpers', I'd like you to seriously consider if it would've been safe, as a political dissident, as a gay man in countrires where being gay is punishable by death, or as a resident of a country ruined by war, to wait it out in a 'queue' until Australia, or another safe country, had processed their refugee status applications.

    Here are some practical things you can do to help.

    The first, and most urgent thing to do is contact your political representatives. I would recommend contacting both Malcolm Turnbull, and your local MP, and possibly Peter Dutton. All are reachable by phone, or email. You can find the contact details by Googling 'contact NAME OF MP'. If you don't know who your MP is, you can find this out by looking up your address on the AEC website. That will give you the name of your MP and you can take it from there. I would strongly urg you to do so in particular if you live in a marginal ALP electorate. The Labor Party need to know that their current silence and policy on this issue is unacceptable and will have an impact on their vote.

    If you want to do more than just shout into the void, the Asylum Seeker Resource Centre is the place to start. They tend to need medical professionals of all kinds, as well as translators (especially Arabic, Farsi, and languages spoken in Afghanistan), at very short notice. If this is something you can help with, get in touch, or follow them on social media to keep up to date with what they might need.

    If you celebrate Christmas, and you were going to send cards this year, might I recommend spending the money supporting a refugee charity instead? I will be doing so this year, donating to a UK-based refugee charity. In Australia, the ASRC is running a Christmas appeal. Donate here.

    If a protest is happening in your city, go along. I am highly skeptical that these protests are going to move the hard hearts of our politicians, but I know that they lift the spirits of the refugees, so it's really important that they see that Australians haven't abandoned them. I know of rallies happening in Melbourne and Canberra this weekend, and I'm sure that there are others in the other major cities. If you need help finding out about protests in your city or town, let me know and I'll try to find out.

    Finally, if you're on social media, and you feel able, you should follow these men and bear witness to what they are experiencing. Here are several accounts that I know of:

    Behrouz Boochani: [twitter.com profile] BehrouzBoochani
    Ezatullah Kakar: [twitter.com profile] EzatullahKakar
    Walid Zazai: [twitter.com profile] ZazaiWalid
    Abdul Aziz Adam: [twitter.com profile] Aziz58825713

    I should warn that I find it deeply distressing to read their accounts, so make your own judgement as to whether this is something you can handle.

    If anyone else has any suggestions, please feel free to make them in the comments. I am happy for this post to be shared anywhere you like.
    dolorosa_12: (Default)
    I. A friend of mine, a (white) university lecturer from Canada who did his undergraduate and postgraduate degrees in the UK, was in a pub with his wife, a (white) British secondary school teacher. One of the other patrons started ranting against 'the immigrants'. My friend pointed out how expensive and difficult it was to emigrate to the UK, using his own situation as an illustration.

    'Oh, I wasn't talking about you,' the ranter said. 'It should be easier for people like you to emigrate. You're not like all those others.'

    II. I have been in the UK on several student visas, and the process is extremely complicated and very strict. You must prove yourself able to support yourself financially, prove that you're a genuine student, and, if English is not your native language, prove English-language competence. I am now on a one-year post-study work visa, which is similarly arduous to receive. If I were not in a relationship with a person from within the EU, I would have to leave the UK - the country in which I have lived for the past seven years - next June.

    Almost all my non-EU friends in the UK who have finished their postgraduate studies are here on spouse visas. Employers don't want the expense and hassle of applying for work visas. Those friends of mine who don't have a partner from an EU country have left.

    III. A friend of mine, an American woman who did her undergraduate and postgraduate study in the UK and is married to a British man, recently took the test to apply for indefinite leave to remain as the spouse of a British citizen. Every single question was a variation on the following theme:

    'Are you eligible for benefits in such-and-such a situation?'
    'No.'

    IV. As a German citizen, my partner can waltz through passport control in seconds. He can earn as much or as little as he likes. He can stay in the UK forever. But he cannot vote in general elections.

    As a non-EU citizen, I am occasionally hassled at passport control (although less than someone non-white and non-native-English-speaking), as if my student status might be suspect. I must prove that I have access to funds beyond my actual daily needs every time I apply for a visa, even though I am eligible for no state benefits. I can vote in general elections, but my time in this country is measured in visa expiry dates.

    V. Were I to want to move to Germany with my partner, we would have to get married, as although the UK treats de facto relationships as equal to marriages, Germany does not recognise them. However, since same-sex marriage is illegal, same-sex de facto relationships are exempt from this restriction.

    VI. I come from a country whose leader - an immigrant from the UK - locks up refugees in internment camps in various Pacific countries and denies that the situations from which they've fled are really all that bad.

    Anti-immigrant rhetoric in Australia suggests that the country is being overwhelmed by floods of these refugees, but in actual fact, the number of refugees who have arrived in Australia by boat in the past decade is a fraction of the number of refugees who arrived in Italy in a single year.

    VII. One of my colleagues at Original Library Job is a (white) British man. Two years ago, he got into a relationship with a Chinese woman who had entered the country on a partner visa with another British man (that relationship had since ended). My colleague and the Chinese woman got married and applied for a spouse visa.

    This was denied on the basis that their relationship was not genuine, and because the UK Border Agency believed that because the woman was a political dissident, she was using my colleague to get out of China. Their case is still dragging through the courts, and apart from one brief holiday together in Thailand, they have not been able to see each other. As she was refused a UK visa, the woman is denied entry to all other EU countries as well.

    VIII. I reject the dichotomy by which a wealthy, educated Westerner who emigrates for work or study opportunities is an 'ex-pat' while a poor person from a non-Western country who emigrates to escape dangerous or difficult political, social, environmental or economic circumstances is an 'immigrant'. I am an immigrant. My German partner is an immigrant. The Polish woman who cleaned my former college accommodation is an immigrant. The girl I went to school with whose father was jailed for political dissidence in Thailand was (originally) an immigrant, though she may identify as Australian now. Our relative privilege levels mean that we are not treated equally, nor should we pretend that we are all the same. But on a basic level, we should reject any language that implies that one type of immigrant is excellent (and should have an easier time of it) while another type is to be despised and mistrusted.

    IX. In other words, if you are arguing against racists by saying that not all immigrants are brown and/or Muslims, I don't want you on my side.
    dolorosa_12: (doctor horrible)
    That's to say I have one more day to bury my head in the sand and pretend that my country is not going to be governed by a racist, sexist, homophobic eugenicist.

    I'm an election tragic, so I'll be watching the coverage obsessively from very early in the morning.

    Right now, however, I'm in serious denial and wondering if it's worth watching all the songs from Keating! The Musical We Had to Have.

    Sigh.

    ETA:



    'But still I dream
    Of a country rich and clever
    With compassion and endeavour
    Reaching out towards forever, and I'm still
    Dreaming of the light on the hill.'

    Apparently I have Labor Party feelings. Who knew?
    dolorosa_12: (doctor horrible)
    Everyone expected me to become a journalist. My parents are journalists, and all their friends are journalists, and I grew up in Canberra, where it sometimes feels like everyone is either a journalist, a politician or a public servant. When I was growing up, the concepts of 'adult' and 'journalist' were almost interchangeable.

    I say 'journalists', but what I really mean is 'political journalists'. My father is a very senior political journalist, and so are most of his friends. Hell, even the woman who introduced my dad to my stepmother is a senior political journalist.

    I could tell you any number of wacky stories relating to politicians - like the time Paul Keating rang our home number in a blistering rage in 1992 because Dad had said something unflattering on the news, and I, a seven-year-old, answered the phone and had a rather surreal conversation with the surly Prime Minister. Or the time I got roped into a dinner at Bill Shorten's house (because his then-partner knew my stepmother) before Shorten became a politician, where everyone smoked indoors and he tried not to make his ambitions so obvious. Or the time when I was 22 years old and accidentally met Wayne Swan while I was wearing my pyjamas and he proceeded to grill me about opinions of Labor among young people.

    Political journalists were my mentors. When I was a child they treated me like a sort of precocious pet, when I was a teenager they tried to steer me in that direction as a career, and when I did, briefly, become a journalist as an adult, they treated me as one of their own. I looked up to them and thought there could be no one as clever and eloquent and cynical and powerful as them. When my father broke very important political stories, I basked in reflected glory, and when Kevin Rudd first emerged as a credible candidate in 2007, I stood in the newsroom with the other journalists, glued to the TV and feeling as if I were participating in something powerful.

    And I think it's fairly obvious that I'm extremely left-leaning, so I don't feel like I need to say anything about the horrors that have been going on in the Labor Party since it came to power, because you know what I will say, and what I will feel.

    I have always responded to Australian politics like a journalist, even as a child, and even now, when it's five years since I could call myself such a thing. And that is why it hurts. Because political journalism in Australia, particularly after Gillard came to power, is a disgrace. It has reduced everything to personality - and so personality, not policy, came to matter. I am ashamed to have been a journalist, and to have had a journalist's mentality. My childhood memories are tainted. I feel like my trust has been betrayed.

    The recent leadership spill upset me less because it will hand Australia to Tony Abbott on a plate, than because it is the crowning moment in a series of things that have shown the Australian political media in an extremely poor light. I know these priorities of mine are messed up, but it is what it is.
    dolorosa_12: (flight of the conchords)
    I haven't had internet at home for a while, so I'm just now catching up on all my feeds, There's been a lot of interesting stuff posted recently, so I thought I'd make a linkpost.

    Sarah Rees Brennan posted this thought-provoking piece about what it means to be an author and have an internet presence.

    And then, for a total change in tone, she wrote a hilarious liveblog of Teen Wolf, making it sound so funny that I might be tempted to check it out.

    Catherynne M. Valente posted about how she was fed up with arguing about ebooks.

    She also wrote about the misconceptions social conservatives hold about 'women's work', and the supposed golden age of pre-industrial times.

    [livejournal.com profile] sophiamcdougall made a Romanitas playlist. I geeked out.

    Here's an article from Rolling Stone about the effects of global warming in Australia. I found myself nodding away to pretty much everything being said.

    It's been said before, but it needs to be said again: unpaid internships are exploitative and perpetuate inequality.

    Our forum interviewed Philip Pullman.

    Finally, I blogged about the start of the semester in Germany.
    dolorosa_12: (flight of the conchords)
    I haven't had internet at home for a while, so I'm just now catching up on all my feeds, There's been a lot of interesting stuff posted recently, so I thought I'd make a linkpost.

    Sarah Rees Brennan posted this thought-provoking piece about what it means to be an author and have an internet presence.

    And then, for a total change in tone, she wrote a hilarious liveblog of Teen Wolf, making it sound so funny that I might be tempted to check it out.

    Catherynne M. Valente posted about how she was fed up with arguing about ebooks.

    She also wrote about the misconceptions social conservatives hold about 'women's work', and the supposed golden age of pre-industrial times.

    [livejournal.com profile] sophiamcdougall made a Romanitas playlist. I geeked out.

    Here's an article from Rolling Stone about the effects of global warming in Australia. I found myself nodding away to pretty much everything being said.

    It's been said before, but it needs to be said again: unpaid internships are exploitative and perpetuate inequality.

    Our forum interviewed Philip Pullman.

    Finally, I blogged about the start of the semester in Germany.
    dolorosa_12: (dreaming)
    These are my two favourite (Australian) political songs.

    Clips and lyrics )

    Julia: I am relieved that Labor remains in power, but I'm watching. Please don't screw things up.
    dolorosa_12: (dreaming)
    These are my two favourite (Australian) political songs.

    Clips and lyrics )

    Julia: I am relieved that Labor remains in power, but I'm watching. Please don't screw things up.
    dolorosa_12: (skepticism)
    Well, we still don't have a government (well, we have a caretaker government, if you want to get technical), and the thought of living in a country run by Tony Abbott is so depressing that I prefer to bury my head in the nearest sandbank. If the election campaign and results were decidedly lacklustre, the election comedy, from the Chaser's latest show (Yes We Canberra) to the collection of links I've been gathering over the past few weeks, are not.

    Here are a few of my favourites )

    Never has the music of a post seemed so appropriate! I laugh, because it's either that or cry.
    dolorosa_12: (skepticism)
    Well, we still don't have a government (well, we have a caretaker government, if you want to get technical), and the thought of living in a country run by Tony Abbott is so depressing that I prefer to bury my head in the nearest sandbank. If the election campaign and results were decidedly lacklustre, the election comedy, from the Chaser's latest show (Yes We Canberra) to the collection of links I've been gathering over the past few weeks, are not.

    Here are a few of my favourites )

    Never has the music of a post seemed so appropriate! I laugh, because it's either that or cry.
    dolorosa_12: (flight of the conchords)
    I've got lots of great links tonight.

    The first two are from i09. Honestly, I really should add it to my RSS feed, rather than waiting for other places to link me to awesome stories, as that site always has really great articles.

    The first one is about what 'Team Jacob' (or rather, the 'defeat' of Team Jacob) represents in Twilight. The second, via [livejournal.com profile] thelxiepia, is about tropes in television (but not TV Tropes). They're both really thought-provoking.

    [livejournal.com profile] ceilidh_ann has a great post snarking Cassandra Clare's book City of Ashes. It's part of a series of posts reviewing dodgy YA literature.

    Hal Duncan has an excellent article up at BSC about the Last Airbender film.

    Finally, the Australian federal election has been called for 21st August. I don't think I know many 17- or 18-year-old Australians who read this blog, but if there are any of you reading, make sure you're registered to vote. Being in the UK myself, I'm going to have to figure out how to vote from over here, since I'm going to be flying back from Ireland that day. Clearly, I'll have to get a postal vote, so I should organise that as soon as possible. Any UK-based Australians reading this should sort out what they're doing, too.

    ETA: Via [livejournal.com profile] angelofboox, this Marauder-era Facebook timeline by Julvett on DeviantArt. The link goes to part 1. There are three parts.
    dolorosa_12: (flight of the conchords)
    I've got lots of great links tonight.

    The first two are from i09. Honestly, I really should add it to my RSS feed, rather than waiting for other places to link me to awesome stories, as that site always has really great articles.

    The first one is about what 'Team Jacob' (or rather, the 'defeat' of Team Jacob) represents in Twilight. The second, via [livejournal.com profile] thelxiepia, is about tropes in television (but not TV Tropes). They're both really thought-provoking.

    [livejournal.com profile] ceilidh_ann has a great post snarking Cassandra Clare's book City of Ashes. It's part of a series of posts reviewing dodgy YA literature.

    Hal Duncan has an excellent article up at BSC about the Last Airbender film.

    Finally, the Australian federal election has been called for 21st August. I don't think I know many 17- or 18-year-old Australians who read this blog, but if there are any of you reading, make sure you're registered to vote. Being in the UK myself, I'm going to have to figure out how to vote from over here, since I'm going to be flying back from Ireland that day. Clearly, I'll have to get a postal vote, so I should organise that as soon as possible. Any UK-based Australians reading this should sort out what they're doing, too.

    ETA: Via [livejournal.com profile] angelofboox, this Marauder-era Facebook timeline by Julvett on DeviantArt. The link goes to part 1. There are three parts.

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