dolorosa_12: (matilda)
This is just a quick note to say I've written a review of Aliette de Bodard's The House of Binding Thorns, over on my Wordpress blog.

I focus in the review mainly on the female characters in the book, but that's not to say that I didn't enjoy all other aspects!

Anyone who's read, or plans to read the novel is free to discuss it with me, either here, or in the comments of the Wordpress blog post.
dolorosa_12: (sleepy hollow)
It was fairly inevitable that I would eventually come down with a cold: this week has been heavy on activities, and short on sleep. As well as going to two back-to-back concerts (one of which necessitated travelling to London after work, and thus not arriving back in Cambridge until after midnight on a work night), I was at yesterday's anti-Brexit march in London, and followed that up with a friend's birthday party in the evening. It seems to have been that, combined with last night's arrival of daylight savings time, that finally brought the cold on. I'm feeling decidedly exhausted, and don't think next week is going to be all that much fun...

The march itself was well attended (estimates put the crowd size at about 100,000, which is not massive, but not terrible), although I'm aware that it's a fairly futile gesture at this point. It mattered to me that I was there — as it has mattered to me that I've been present at other large marches that were nothing more than symbolic, futile gestures to register discontent. No matter how many people showed up at yesterday's march, Article 50 is still going to be triggered on the 29th, and the UK is going to continue on its dangerous course towards isolation, nationalistic extremism, and impoverished decline. But it's precisely for this reason that I felt people's presence at events such as yesterday's march were important: there needed to be a recorded, visible historical record that showed that not everyone in the country was marching in ideological lockstep out of the EU, and that leaving was not done in everyone's name, nor with everyone's consent.

Next week is going to be difficult, particularly for EU friends living in the UK (and their non-EU family members whose immigration status depends on Britain being a member-state of the EU). I wish I could offer words of comfort or courage, but I've got nothing. It's a terrible thing that is happening, a decision made by people who voted to take something away from others, something they'd never understood, never knowingly made use of (the irony being that all the times they did make use of it were invisible to them), and whose value they were unable to perceive.
dolorosa_12: (le guin)
This is just a brief post to mention that I have (finally) dusted off my Wordpress blog to write a review of a few books that I've enjoyed recently. The review covers The Rose and the Dagger by Renée Ahdieh, Sorrow's Knot by Erin Bow, and The Song Rising by Samantha Shannon. It's spoiler-free, but given that two of the books reviewed are not the first in their respective series, it does touch on events in earlier books. The review can be found here, and I'm happy to respond to comments either on the original post, or here on LJ/Dreamwidth.

I'm gearing up to nominate some fandoms and characters for Night on Fic Mountain, one of my favourite multi-fandom fic exchanges. It's an exchange for small fandoms (similar to Yuletide, although normally on a slightly smaller scale), and I thoroughly enjoyed it last year when I participated for the first time. I highly recommend it to those of you who participate in fic exchanges. Nominations are currently open, and will be until 31st March. There are more details about the schedule for the exchange here.
dolorosa_12: (sister finland)
I am very much Not Coping (with, well, take your pick of the conga line of political horrors parading their way around the world), which has made posting (and indeed, being online at all) very difficult. As such, this is going to be brief.

You may have seen this already on your own Dreamwidth feeds, but [personal profile] inkstone has set up a bullet journalling comm, [community profile] bujo, if anyone's interested. I've started using a bullet journal this year; I've always been a dedicated planner, and I'm combining bullet journal use with the online management tool Trello, as well a standard weekly planner, because one form of organiser is never enough!

I also have a question for those of you who regularly participate in fic exchanges. Last year I had a kind of vaguely defined goal to participate in more exchanges than Yuletide, and ended up doing both Night On Fic Mountain, and My Old Fandom (as well as Yuletide). I enjoyed both immensely, and if they run again, I'll definitely be signing up. In fact, I enjoyed writing for those exchanges so much that I'm completely hooked, and want to participate in even more! That's where you come in. I'm asking for recs for fic exchanges that you particularly enjoyed. It probably helps a bit to know more about what I liked about the exchanges in which I've participated thus far:

  • They were for small fandoms (not big megafandoms) and not fandom-specific

  • Participants could write gen or shipfic (I think I'd be happy to participate in a gen-only exchange, but to be honest I prefer the flexibility)

  • The lower word-count limits were low - 1000 words is fine, but a 5000-word lower limit would probably be difficult for me

  • They weren't happening at the same time as Yuletide, or immediately before or after


  • Based on those preferences, are there any exchanges you'd particular recommend? I like writing fic that centres on female characters (M/F, F/F, or female character-centric gen), if that helps.
    dolorosa_12: (Default)
    I've added a bunch of new people as a result of [personal profile] st_aurafina's recent friending meme, so I thought it was high time to introduce myself.

    Feel free to skip if you've had me in your circle/flist for a while )

    I'm really looking forward to getting to know you! Please feel free to ask whatever questions you like.
    dolorosa_12: (sokka)
    I was planning to do a combined reveals and recs post, but I'm feeling a bit under the weather, and I think I'll leave the recs until tomorrow, when I'm feeling better and more able to write coherent recs.

    I wrote four fics this year. I had always been intending to write at least one treat on top of my assignment, as one of my goals for 2016 had been to push myself a bit more with my writing. All the four fics seem to have been well received, and overall I feel I had a great Yuletide.

    My assignment was for [archiveofourown.org profile] neuxue, and we matched on Robin McKinley's Sunshine. The following fic is the result:

    Dappled Light by [archiveofourown.org profile] Dolorosa
    Fandom: Sunshine - Robin McKinley
    Rating: General Audiences
    Warnings: No Archive Warnings Apply
    Word Count: 2709
    Characters: Rae "Sunshine" Seddon, Mel (Sunshine), Original Characters
    Summary: In the wake of her confrontation with Bo and unsettling alliance with Con, Sunshine needs time to come to terms with her newer, darker powers, and her fears for the future. She finds help in an unexpected quarter. This story takes place shortly after the events of Sunshine.

    I also wrote the other Sunshine fic this Yuletide, as a treat for [archiveofourown.org profile] corbae.

    Like Bitter Chocolate by [archiveofourown.org profile] Dolorosa
    Fandom: Sunshine - Robin McKinley
    Rating: General Audiences
    Warnings: No Archive Warnings Apply
    Word Count: 4354
    Characters: Rae "Sunshine" Seddon, Mel (Sunshine), Constantine (Sunshine), Charlie Seddon, Aimil (Sunshine), Yolande (Sunshine), Pat (Sunshine)
    Summary: Five times Sunshine stuck to the recipe, and one time she didn't. Post-Sunshine.

    As soon as I noticed that someone had requested The Pagan Chronicles who wasn't me, I knew I had to write for them. It really is one of my most beloved fandoms of the heart, and it's always miraculous to find a fellow fan, especially someone who likes it enough to want fic, so I was really happy to be able to write a treat for [archiveofourown.org profile] Chocolatepot. I ended up writing a short, canon-divergent AU, and I enjoyed writing it so much that I'm considering continuing the story in a new fic or series of fics.

    Shells on the Road by [archiveofourown.org profile] Dolorosa
    Fandom: Pagan Chronicles - Catherine Jinks
    Rating: General Audiences
    Warnings: No Archive Warnings Apply
    Word Count: 1217
    Characters: Pagan Kidrouk, Isidore Orbus, Babylonne Kidrouk
    Summary: Pagan and Isidore have rescued Babylonne from a lifetime of drudgery and terrible relatives. Now the trio are on the run, heading west towards the pilgrimage route of Santiago de Compostela. Babylonne is dubious about the benefits of horse-riding, Pagan is relishing every opportunity for an argument, and Isidore is longing for a return to a life of bookish, peaceful contemplation.

    It seems to have become something of a tradition for me to write Wise Child fic during Yuletide — I've been participating now for three years, and for the first two years I was assigned to write a gift in this fandom. This year, I decided not to offer it, but [archiveofourown.org profile] Merriman's prompt grabbed me, and I ended up writing the longest fic I have ever written. It's based very loosely on the medieval Irish tale Tochmarc Étaíne ('The Wooing of Étaín'), and I absolutely loved writing it. (In my head it sort of exists in the same universe as the other two fics I've written for this fandom — both mention Trewyn going to Ireland and doing doran work for kings there — but all three are self-contained and make sense if read in isolation.)

    On the Boundary Walls by [archiveofourown.org profile] Dolorosa
    Fandom: Wise Child Series - Monica Furlong
    Rating: General Audiences
    Warnings: No Archive Warnings Apply
    Word Count: 8009
    Characters: Trewyn (Wise Child Series), Juniper (Wise Child Series), Angharad of the West (Wise Child Series)
    Summary: After several years spent roaming around Britain together, Juniper and Trewyn part ways. Trewyn's journey takes her to Ireland, where she travels strange paths. This story occurs between the events of Juniper and Wise Child.

    I would be remiss if I didn't mention my absolutely marvellous gift, written for me by [archiveofourown.org profile] antediluvian, which made me ridiculously happy. I've been requesting Demon's Lexicon fic for several exchanges without luck, and had actually given up on nominating or requesting it. It wasn't in my original list of requests, but as I was editing my sign-up, I noticed the fandom in the list of nominated fandoms, and added it into my request on a whim. The fic I received was perfect — my author managed to include all of my prompts, and really got why I loved this canon in the first place. I'm planning to spend the rest of the afternoon going through their other fic and seeing if they've written anything else I like.

    Tell me in the glance of a hand by [archiveofourown.org profile] antediluvian
    Rating: Mature
    Warnings: No Archive Warnings Apply
    Word Count: 6270
    Characters: Mae Crawford, Nicholas "Nick" Ryves | Hnikarr
    Summary: “This is fine," Nick said. "It’s defensible.”

    “Ah yes,” Mae said. “That was obviously top of my list of qualities for a first date.”


    I hope those of you who did Yuletide this year had as great a Yuletide as I did!
    dolorosa_12: (flight of the conchords)
    I have a brief moment of calm between a week that's been very full on, with lots of intensive teaching, and essentially a week with an event happening almost every night. This is mainly because the Cambridge Film Festival, and the Cambridge Festival of Ideas have pretty much overlapped this year. For someone like me, who has very low energy and needs to spend a lot of time doing quiet stuff at home, it's going to be fun but exhausting.

    Coming up over the next week or so:

  • A concert (Aurora) on Saturday 15th

  • A film (American Honey) on Tuesday 18th

  • A concert (Birdy) on Wednesday 19th

  • A talk ([twitter.com profile] Nalo_Hopkinson) on Thursday 20th

  • A talk (on new media) on Saturday 22nd

  • Apple Day (basically show up and eat as many types of apples as you can) on Sunday 23rd

  • A film (The Handmaiden) on Monday 24th

  • A film (Toni Erdmann) on Tuesday 25th

  • A talk (Farah Mendlesohn on children's fantasy novels) on Wednesday 26th

  • A film (Into the Inferno) on Thursday 27th


  • I feel exhausted just thinking about it! But everything should be a lot of fun.

    I wrote a new post on my Wordpress blog. It's a review of A Torch Against the Night by Sabaa Tahir.
    dolorosa_12: (emily hanna)
    The three things in this post's title sit rather incongruously next to each other, but together make up this weekend. I spent most of yesterday in Bedford, where Matthias had to travel to take his 'Life in the UK' test, a prerequisite for a successful application for British citizenship by naturalisation. Matthias will be applying for this in the near future, and this test is simply one of the administrative hoops through which he is required to jump. It involves answering a series of simplistic and somewhat silly questions about British history, culture and politics. Although he had studied, and passed every practice test without difficulty, we were more concerned that his proof of address (a printed bank statement) wasn't going to be accepted by the test administrators, as at least one person we know had been turned away for the rather silly reason of not having his name printed on each page of his bank statement. Thankfully, Matthias was not turned away at the door, and the test was so easy that he completed it in three minutes. He was informed that he had passed then and there, and so his naturalisation application can go ahead. For various bureaucratic reasons he will not be able to apply until early next year, but it's nice to have this out of the way good and early.

    After the test, we met up with some friends who live in Bedford for beer (or, in my case, gin) and curry, which struck me as a very British way to celebrate Matthias' impending Britishness.

    Today the two of us met up with [personal profile] naye and [personal profile] doctorskuld and went to a food fair. There were a lot of free samples, and Matthias and I came away with sausages, various types of cheese, and a small collection of vinegars and sauces. We opted not to eat lunch at the food fair and headed over to a hipsterish cafe with antique bikes hanging from the ceiling, and a menu in which half the items consisted of avocado on toast. I don't like avocado, but luckily the other half of the menu was filled with things I like, so there was no danger of going hungry.

    I've just written a review of some of my recent reading. It's a review of books by Shira Glassman, Becky Chambers, and Kate Elliott, and can be found at my Wordpress blog. I highly recommend all three books.

    Yuletide is fast approaching. My nominations have all been approved (there was never any danger of that — I'm highly unlikely to nominate borderline fandoms, but it's nice to have the confirmation), so I guess I'd better get on to writing my letter and thinking about what fandoms to offer myself!

    I hope everyone else has been having wonderful weekends.
    dolorosa_12: (le guin)
    Thanks to some prodding (and an invite code from [personal profile] st_aurafina) I am now on Imzy as Dolorosa. I'm not sure I'm going to use it as a blogging platform unless I can figure out how to crosspost here, but I've joined a bunch of communities and am going to just lurk a bit until I can figure out how everything works.

    So yeah, if you're on Imzy, feel free to follow me (although if your username is very different, could you let me know who you are), and also do rec me some communities.

    (Also, if I were to start a comm there for Australian YA — both early stuff from my childhood, and current stuff — would anyone be interested?)
    dolorosa_12: (matilda)
    This year, I set myself a reading challenge on Goodreads. It was the same as last year's: fifty books, which to me seemed a modest goal. Last year I was reading right up until 31st December (if I say I'm going to do something, I do it, even if it's massively inconvenient), and looking back, I read quite a few things out of a sense of duty, rather than a genuine desire to read them. I was anxious about the breadth of my reading, and basically didn't let myself give up on any books.

    This year, it's mid-August and I've already finished the fifty books in the challenge. And the whole process has been a joy.

    The difference is that I gave myself permission to just read what I wanted and not worry about the composition of my reading list. And while I've still read a couple of duds, as well as a bunch of books that were merely solid, rather than life-changing, I've enjoyed reading and been enthusiastic about it in a way that I hadn't been for ages. Sure, I did read some stuff I really enjoyed last year (Silver on the Road, Sorcerer to the Crown, and Black Wolves spring immediately to mind), but I often felt reluctant or unenthusiastic about the books I'd chosen, and frequently went for entire weeks without reading a single book.

    The year is barely halfway over, and I've finished my reading challenge, but looking forward to the next five months — and the books they'll contain — with great anticipation. It strikes me as incredibly messed up that I was feeling actual anxiety about reading — an activity which had up until that point been one of my favourites — and I'm glad I've been able to restore the sense of joy and happiness which had been missing. After all, what is the point of reading for pleasure if you get no pleasure out of it?

    (Speaking of Goodreads, I'm Dolorosa over there if you want to add me. I only use it to log the books I've read, but it's always nice to see what others are reading, so do feel free to add me if you want. If your username is really different to your Dreamwidth/LJ one, could you let me know who you are, though, so that I don't get confused.)
    dolorosa_12: (Default)
    I realise it's Thursday, but I've got a review up of a trio of YA books: Tell the Wind and Fire by Sarah Rees Brennan, An Ember in the Ashes by Sabaa Tahir, and Court of Fives by Kate Elliott, all of which can be loosely linked by a theme of divided cities.

    The review is up on Wordpress, and feel free to comment here or there.
    dolorosa_12: (epic internet)
    As with Reading Wednesday posts, I'm not sure if this is going to happen every week, but I would like to make it a semi-regular feature. This week, I've got a couple of fics, a fanvid, and a playlist.

    5 Easy Rules for the Children of A-List Celebrities by [archiveofourown.org profile] igrockspock (Veronica Mars, Logan Echolls, Aaron Echolls, Lynn Echolls, gen. Contains canon typical reference to child abuse).

    What Goes Around (Comes Around) by [archiveofourown.org profile] Isis (Raven Cycle multipairing fic). This is only the first chapter of a five-part fic, and I can't wait to read more.

    Still staying in the Raven Cycle, I made what started out as a Blue Sargent playlist, but morphed into something more Blue/Gansey. You can find it here at 8tracks, and I've got the full track listing here.

    Finally, via [personal profile] goodbyebird, some great Festivids recs. My favourite was this one, Council Estate, which is for Attack the Block.
    dolorosa_12: (epic internet)
    This is the first time I've been able to come up for air since the whole Christmas/New Year period, and I guess Yuletide's kind of been and gone, but I read some fantastic stuff this year and want to post a few recs.

    I wrote this fic:

    'Weaving the Bones'; Wise Child series; Juniper, Euny, Angharad, Trewyn, original characters; gen.

    My gift was this breathtakingly good Romanitas fic, 'Nor one fine day', by [archiveofourown.org profile] a_la_greque. It was exactly what I wanted.

    And now, onward to the other recs!

    Court of Fives, Daria, Mad Max: Fury Road, Sorcerer to the Crown )
    dolorosa_12: (what's left? me)
    This week's post is a day early, as I'm going to be in London tomorrow and away from a computer. It's also going to be fairly Jessica Jones heavy, but I will separate those links off from everything else.

    Building on the ongoing conversation about conventions' failure to provide a safe and accessible experience for disabled attendees, Mary Robinette Kowal has started a SFF convention accessibility pledge, which I encourage everyone who's likely to attend a convention to sign.

    These two posts by Rose Lemberg on the experiences of disabled fans, and the dismissal of their concerns and requests for accommodations and accessibility, are really important, and I encourage you to read them.

    Michelle Vider writes: Station Eleven is a love letter to technology, one I never could have written myself.

    Isabel Yap put together a fantastic collection of recommendations of Filipina poets, many of whom were new to me. I highly recommend reading their work.

    Here's Kate Elliott on '10 Fantasy Novels Whose Depiction of Women Did Not Make Me Want to Smash Things'.

    Kate Elliott also dropped by the Fangirl Happy Hour podcast.

    This recent Galactic Suburbia podcast was also great.

    More Isobelle Carmody:

    Of the many readers Carmody has met, some have made lasting impressions. The young woman who established the fan site obernewtyn.net has become a close friend. Another has proved a sharp-eyed editor for Carmody's unpublished books. Many have said they feel that the conclusion of The Obernewtyn Chronicles marks the end of their childhood.

    Sophia McDougall's post on trigger/content warnings said a lot of things that I've been trying to say on the matter for a while. Needless to say, content warning for discussion of abuse.

    I loved this article about the depiction of early motherhood on Jane the Virgin

    Phoebe Robinson talks about 'How Daria Shaped A Generation of Women (Particularly This Black One)'.

    I loved this photoshoot, in which five authors dressed up as their favourite fictional characters.

    There are new reviews up on Those Who Run With Wolves. Aliette de Bodard reviewed Black Wolves by Kate Elliott. I reviewed Serpentine by Cindy Pon.

    Jessica Jones links

    I'm somewhat astonished by the intensity of my reaction to, and identification with, this show, but it's clear that I'm not alone in this.

    'Marvel's Newest Show Makes Surviving Trauma A Superpower' goes a long way toward explaining the strength of my feelings about this show.

    Jessica Jones is a primer on gaslighting, and how to protect yourself against it. Oh, my heart.

    Renay of Ladybusiness and Ana of Booksmugglers discussed it on Twitter, and Charles Tan made a Storify of their conversation.
    dolorosa_12: (emily)
    This has been one of those weekends where everything came together perfectly, seemingly without much effort on my part. It was desperately needed: not only was the past week particularly exhausting (and seemingly endless) but I have also not really had a free weekend for at least a month. So although this weekend ended up being quite packed, it was relaxing, and I feel rested in a way that I haven't for a long time.

    On Friday night my colleagues and I had our work Christmas party. We went to this restaurant, which had amazing food. I'm someone who likes to keep a fairly rigid separation between work and the rest of my life, so although I get on well with my colleagues, I always feel a bit weird about seeing them socially and drinking alcohol with them. However, the party was fun, and I'm glad I went.

    I ended up spending most of yesterday rushing around running errands. The final Obernewtyn book (an Australian YA dystopian series that has been in existence since 1987, and which I've been reading since 1999, to give you some idea of how long I've been waiting for the last book) was delivered on Friday, but as no one was home, I had to go and collect it from the depot on Saturday. (My heroic mother pre-ordered a copy, and then paid $AUS60 to send it to me in the UK, as it's not published here yet.) As the book is over 1000 pages long, and as it's the kind of thing that I will need to start, and then not stop until it's finished, I haven't actually begun reading it, but it is reassuring simply to have it in the house.

    Instead, I've been reading Evangeline Walton's Mabinogion, fantasy stories based on the Middle Welsh Mabinogi. This was on the recommendation of [livejournal.com profile] la_marquise_de_'s essay on the author. One of the things Kari emphasised in her essay was the way Walton's writing captured the tone and mood of the original Welsh material, and this was something I most appreciated about the work. It had the strangeness, cadences of the original language, and that undercurrent of melancholy that I find running through so much medieval literature. I'm grateful to Kari for alerting me to the existence of Walton's writing, and highly recommend it.

    On Saturday night, Matthias and I celebrated his birthday with several friends of ours. We went out to dinner at a new pub, which seems to be focusing on Belgian beer, gin (its gin menu listed about thirty different types), mussels and steak. This somewhat strange combination worked really well: the food was excellent, the place was heaving, and I was forced to choose between gin or mulled wine. It was freezing, so I stuck with the wine, which was handmade, and fragrant with cinnamon, cloves, and oranges. Now that none of us are students any more, it's difficult to get groups of our friends together, so it was great to be able to hang out with everyone for an evening.

    Today has mostly been filled with Yuletide writing — I finished my assignment, which means I should have time to get at least one treat done before the deadline — and watching Jessica Jones. We've only watched the first two episodes, but I'm absolutely hooked. It's everything I ever wanted from a TV series, and I'm finding it powerful and resonant in a variety of ways that I will outline further once I've watched the whole thing.

    Now I'm just drinking tea and gearing up for the next working week. I wish I could have more weekends like this!
    dolorosa_12: (emily hanna)
    That title doesn't quite scan, but it will have to do.

    Via Rochita Loenen-Ruiz, probably the best thing I've read all week: Nine Ways We Can Make Social Justice Movements Less Elitist and More Accessible, by Kai Cheng Thom. Really important stuff.

    Read this essay by Sofia Samatar about being a black academic.

    On a related note, Black Sci-fi Creators Assemble at Princeton and Imagine Better Worlds than This One, by Rasheedah Phillips.

    Kari Sperring talks about justice, socialism, fantasy utopias, and Terry Pratchett.

    Here's Alana Piper on the myth that 'women secretly hate each other'. Nothing throws me out of a story faster than female characters with no female friends, so this post was right up my alley.

    Kate Elliott needs your help in a workshop on gender defaults in fantasy.

    Shannon Hale writes about writing outside her culture. Note that at least one of the recommendations of books 'by Asian-American authors' is not by an Asian-American author, but rather, a Palestinian/Egyptian-Australian. It's still a good list.

    Rochita Loenen-Ruiz interviews Zen Cho. I wait impatiently for my copy of Sorcerer To The Crown to arrive.

    As always, the new posts at Ghostwords are a delight.

    Two new reviews are up on Those Who Run With Wolves:

    Vida Cruz reviews Of Sorrow and Such by Angela Slatter.

    I review Space Hostages by Sophia McDougall.

    It has been twenty years since two formative works of my teenage years, Philip Pullman's His Dark Materials trilogy, and the film Hackers, were released. Here's an interview with the Hackers director.

    The Toast remains amazing. Two of my favourite recent posts: Dirtbag Milton (I remember studying him in uni and being furious about how badly he treated his daughters), and How To Tell If You Are In a Lai of Marie de France.

    I hope your weekends are glorious.
    dolorosa_12: (teen wolf)
    The linkpost is early this week, as I'm going to be absolutely flat out all afternoon, and then away on various workshops and conferences. Oh, the glamorous librarian life!

    I'll start with a few reviews and posts about books I loved, or books I'm very much looking forward to reading:

    A joint review of Space Hostages by Sophia McDougall, at Booksmugglers.

    Amal El-Mohtar reviews Sorcerer to the Crown by Zen Cho.

    Zen Cho chats with Mahvesh Murad about the book.

    She talks more about the book here.

    Cindy Pon talks about her new book, Serpentine.

    SFF in Conversation is one of my favourite columns at Booksmugglers. In it, various groups of writers sit down to discuss topics that are important to them. The most recent features Aliette de Bodard, Zen Cho, Kate Elliott, Cindy Pon, and Tade Thompson, and I highly recommend it.

    This is the first part of a BBC radio programme about British folklore, monsters, and the landscape.

    The reviews continue to pour in a Those Who Run With Wolves. Recent reviewers have been Leticia Lara, Athena Andreadis, and Aliette de Bodard.

    Ghostwords has returned with a vengeance! The latest post sports a cornucopia of links, leading the reader off on an internet treasure hunt.

    I very much appreciated this post on No Award about Indigenous (and other) seasonal calendars.

    In case you missed it, I reviewed Karen Memory by Elizabeth Bear, The House of Shattered Wings by Aliette de Bodard, and The Girls at the Kingfisher Club by Genevieve Valentine. I loved them all.

    Men Wearing A Military Helmet and Nothing Else in Western Art History: The Toast is a gift.

    I hope your weekends are filled with as much fun stuff and opportunities for learning as mine will be.
    dolorosa_12: (emily hanna)
    Hello to all the new people now following me as a result of the friending meme (and for those of you who haven't seen the meme yet, it's here).

    I thought I'd introduce myself to all of you. Feel free to ask me questions about anything.

    Feel free to skip if you've had me in your circle/flist for a while )
    dolorosa_12: (matilda)
    I read a lot of fabulous books this (northern) summer, and I've written reviews of three, Karen Memory by Elizabeth Bear, The House of Shattered Wings by Aliette de Bodard, and The Girls at the Kingfisher Club by Genevieve Valentine.

    You can read them over at Wordpress.
    dolorosa_12: (epic internet)
    This past weekend was just wonderful, without all that much actually happening. The weather was exactly as I like it, crisp, clear and bright, with the feeling of autumn in the air. While Matthias worked on his MA coursework, I pottered about, cooking, gardening, and making more fruit-infused liqueurs (blackberry-infused gin!).

    I had all sorts of grand plans for lots of blogging, but in the end, the siren song of 8tracks was too much to resist. The result was this playlist:


    All This Youth Makes Us Old from dolorosa_12 on 8tracks Radio.



    (The description: We are only young and naive still. A playlist for the years full of promise, intensity of emotion, fragility and sharpness, when summers lasted forever and the future seemed very distant indeed.)

    Speaking of 8tracks (which, honestly, is one of my favourite sites on the internet, because it's filled with people who think of music in the same way I do - as a story), this playlist is simply perfect.

    I mentioned Those Who Run With Wolves, a new review website set up by Aliette de Bodard, in a recent linkpost, but what I neglected to say is that I will be contributing. I don't have anything published there as yet, although a review of mine is queued up and ready to go when it's my turn in the posting schedule. The team of reviewers is great, and I'm really happy to be a part of it.

    Finally, I was having a great conversation on Twitter with [twitter.com profile] rcloenenruiz, [twitter.com profile] EPBeaumont and [twitter.com profile] tylluan (with brief contributions from others, and sparked by an earlier comment of [twitter.com profile] karisperring) about the importance of mentors and institutional and community support. The conversation moved too fast to follow, and I wish I'd been able to archive it somehow (Storify might be a possibility, but it was bouncing off in all sorts of different directions and would probably be hard to follow in that format). Twitter is great for conversations, but awful for keeping easy-to-follow records thereof. In any case, it got me thinking that I need to write something here on the subject, so consider this me keeping myself accountable on that score.

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    rushes into my heart and my skull

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